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Losing control : how and why people fail at self-regulation / Roy F. Baumeister, Todd F. Heatherton, Dianne M. Tice.

By: Baumeister, Roy FContributor(s): Heatherton, Todd F | Tice, Dianne MMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: San Diego ; London : Academic Press, c1994. ISBN: 0120831406Subject(s): Self-control | Self-management (Psychology)DDC classification: 153.8 LOC classification: BF632
Contents:
1. Introduction: Self-Regulation Failure in Social and Theoretical Context -- 2. General Patterns and Mechanisms of Self-Regulation Failure -- 3. Task Performance and Self-Regulation Failure: Blowing It -- 4. Self-Management: Taking Care of Yourself -- 5. Thoughts Out of Control -- 6. Failure to Control Emotions and Moods -- 7. Impulses and Appetites -- 8. Alcohol Consumption and Abuse -- 9. Eating too much -- 10. Smoking -- 11. A Sampler of Other Behavioral Control Problems: Gambling, Shopping, and Aggression -- 12. Self-Regulation: Prospects, Problems, and Promises.
Summary: People the world over suffer from the inability to control their finances, their weight, their emotions, their craving for drugs, their sexual impulses, and more. The United States in particular is regarded by some observers as a society addicted to addiction. Therapy and support groups have proliferated not only for alcoholics and drug abusers but for all kinds of impulse control, from gambling to eating chocolate. Common to all of these disorders is a failure of self-regulation, otherwise known as "self-control." The consequences of these self-control problems go beyond individuals to affect family members and society at large. In Losing Control, the authors provide a single reference source with comprehensive information on general patterns of self-regulation failure across contexts, research findings on specific self-control disorders, and commentary on the clinical and social aspects of self-regulation failure. Self-control is discussed in relation to what the "self" is, and the cognitive, motivational, and emotional factors that impinge on one's ability to control one's "self."
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre
Main Shelves
153.8 BAU (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4404731304
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

1. Introduction: Self-Regulation Failure in Social and Theoretical Context -- 2. General Patterns and Mechanisms of Self-Regulation Failure -- 3. Task Performance and Self-Regulation Failure: Blowing It -- 4. Self-Management: Taking Care of Yourself -- 5. Thoughts Out of Control -- 6. Failure to Control Emotions and Moods -- 7. Impulses and Appetites -- 8. Alcohol Consumption and Abuse -- 9. Eating too much -- 10. Smoking -- 11. A Sampler of Other Behavioral Control Problems: Gambling, Shopping, and Aggression -- 12. Self-Regulation: Prospects, Problems, and Promises.

People the world over suffer from the inability to control their finances, their weight, their emotions, their craving for drugs, their sexual impulses, and more. The United States in particular is regarded by some observers as a society addicted to addiction. Therapy and support groups have proliferated not only for alcoholics and drug abusers but for all kinds of impulse control, from gambling to eating chocolate. Common to all of these disorders is a failure of self-regulation, otherwise known as "self-control." The consequences of these self-control problems go beyond individuals to affect family members and society at large. In Losing Control, the authors provide a single reference source with comprehensive information on general patterns of self-regulation failure across contexts, research findings on specific self-control disorders, and commentary on the clinical and social aspects of self-regulation failure. Self-control is discussed in relation to what the "self" is, and the cognitive, motivational, and emotional factors that impinge on one's ability to control one's "self."

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