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Implicit and explicit learning of languages / edited by Nick C. Ellis.

Contributor(s): Ellis, Nick CMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Academic, 1994. ISBN: 0122374754Subject(s): Implicit learning | Learning | Language and languages | Second language acquisitionDDC classification: 401.93
Contents:
Introduction: Implicit and Explicit Language Learning - An Overview / Nick Ellis -- Ch. 1. The Unruly World of Language / M. A. Sharwood Smith -- Ch. 2. The Input Hypothesis and Its Rivals / Stephen D. Krashen -- Ch. 3. A Theory of Instructed Second Language Acquisition / Rod Ellis -- Ch. 4. Implicit Learning and the Acquisition of Natural Languages / Bill Winter and Arthur S. Reber -- Ch. 5. Implicit and Explicit Learning of Complex Tasks / Dianne C. Berry -- Ch. 6. Implicit Learning and the Cognitive Unconscious: Of Artificial Grammars and SLA / Richard Schmidt -- Ch. 7. Vocabulary Acquisition: The Implicit Ins and Outs of Explicit Cognitive Mediation / Nick Ellis -- Ch. 8. Second Language Vocabulary Learning: The Role of Implicit Processes / Kim Kirsner -- Ch. 9. Animal Learning and the Implicit/Explicit Distinction / I. P. L. McLaren, R. E. A. Green and N. J. Mackintosh -- Ch. 10. Differences between Animal and Human Learning: Implicit and Explicit Processes / Richard P. Bentall and David W. Dickins -- Ch. 11. Language Learner and Learning Strategies / Anna Uhl Chamot and J. Michael O'Malley -- Ch. 12. Neurolinguistic Aspects of Implicit and Explicit Memory: Implications for Bilingualism and SLA / Michel Paradis -- Ch. 13. Connectionism and Second Language Acquisition / Peter Broeder and Kim Plunkett -- Ch. 14. Universal Grammar and L1 Acquisition / Ian Roberts -- Ch. 15. The Metaphor of Access to Universal Grammar in L2 Learning / V. J. Cook -- Ch. 16. SLA: Universal Grammar and Language Learnability / William Rutherford -- Ch. 17. The Lure and Language of Implicit Memory: A Developmental Perspective / Kevin Durkin -- Ch. 18. Representation and Ways of Knowing: Three Issues in Second Language Acquisition / Ellen Bialystok.
Summary: How do people learn language? This volume concerns human learning in general and the ability to acquire second, foreign and native languages in particular. It is generally agreed that there are three quite different types of human learning: implicit learning (a non-conscious, automatic abstraction of structure); explicit learning (where, as in problem solving, the learner searches for information and builds and tests hypotheses), and learning as a result of explicit instruction. But how do these processes result in language acquisition? The motivation for this book is that no one discipline can answer this question. In order to help people learn languages, we need an understanding of the cognitive processes involved. This volume brings together contributions from key researchers in psychology, linguistics, philosophy, computing and neuroscience to determine separate types of human learning, their representations and their interactions. Implicit and Explicit Learning of Languages presents the first of such collaborative insights into language acquisition and instruction, with particular emphasis on second language learning. It will be essential reading for students, researchers and practitioners in applied linguistics, cognitive science, cognitive psychology and second language acquisition.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre
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401.93 IMP (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403929724
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Implicit and Explicit Language Learning - An Overview / Nick Ellis -- Ch. 1. The Unruly World of Language / M. A. Sharwood Smith -- Ch. 2. The Input Hypothesis and Its Rivals / Stephen D. Krashen -- Ch. 3. A Theory of Instructed Second Language Acquisition / Rod Ellis -- Ch. 4. Implicit Learning and the Acquisition of Natural Languages / Bill Winter and Arthur S. Reber -- Ch. 5. Implicit and Explicit Learning of Complex Tasks / Dianne C. Berry -- Ch. 6. Implicit Learning and the Cognitive Unconscious: Of Artificial Grammars and SLA / Richard Schmidt -- Ch. 7. Vocabulary Acquisition: The Implicit Ins and Outs of Explicit Cognitive Mediation / Nick Ellis -- Ch. 8. Second Language Vocabulary Learning: The Role of Implicit Processes / Kim Kirsner -- Ch. 9. Animal Learning and the Implicit/Explicit Distinction / I. P. L. McLaren, R. E. A. Green and N. J. Mackintosh -- Ch. 10. Differences between Animal and Human Learning: Implicit and Explicit Processes / Richard P. Bentall and David W. Dickins -- Ch. 11. Language Learner and Learning Strategies / Anna Uhl Chamot and J. Michael O'Malley -- Ch. 12. Neurolinguistic Aspects of Implicit and Explicit Memory: Implications for Bilingualism and SLA / Michel Paradis -- Ch. 13. Connectionism and Second Language Acquisition / Peter Broeder and Kim Plunkett -- Ch. 14. Universal Grammar and L1 Acquisition / Ian Roberts -- Ch. 15. The Metaphor of Access to Universal Grammar in L2 Learning / V. J. Cook -- Ch. 16. SLA: Universal Grammar and Language Learnability / William Rutherford -- Ch. 17. The Lure and Language of Implicit Memory: A Developmental Perspective / Kevin Durkin -- Ch. 18. Representation and Ways of Knowing: Three Issues in Second Language Acquisition / Ellen Bialystok.

How do people learn language? This volume concerns human learning in general and the ability to acquire second, foreign and native languages in particular. It is generally agreed that there are three quite different types of human learning: implicit learning (a non-conscious, automatic abstraction of structure); explicit learning (where, as in problem solving, the learner searches for information and builds and tests hypotheses), and learning as a result of explicit instruction. But how do these processes result in language acquisition? The motivation for this book is that no one discipline can answer this question. In order to help people learn languages, we need an understanding of the cognitive processes involved. This volume brings together contributions from key researchers in psychology, linguistics, philosophy, computing and neuroscience to determine separate types of human learning, their representations and their interactions. Implicit and Explicit Learning of Languages presents the first of such collaborative insights into language acquisition and instruction, with particular emphasis on second language learning. It will be essential reading for students, researchers and practitioners in applied linguistics, cognitive science, cognitive psychology and second language acquisition.

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