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The images of time [electronic resource] : an essay on temporal representation / Robin Le Poidevin.

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780199265893Publication details: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2007.Edition: illustrated editionISBN:
  • 9780191532764
  • 9780199265893
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: No titleDDC classification:
  • 115 22
LOC classification:
  • BD638 .L33 2007
Online resources: Available additional physical forms:
  • Also available in printed form.
Incomplete contents:
PART I: ASPECTS OF TIME AND REPRESENTATION; 1. The Project; 2. Causal Theories of Representation; 3. Egocentric and Objective Representation; PART II: MEMORY AND PERCEPTION; 4. Retracing the Past: Memory and Passage; 5. Projecting the Present: The Shock of the Now; 6. The Wider View: Precedence and Duration; PART III: ART AND FICTION; 7. Image and Instant: The Pictorial Representation of Time; 8. The Fictional Future; 9. The Unity of Time and Narrative; Conclusion
Summary: The Images of Time presents a philosophical investigation of the nature of time and the mind's ways of representing it. Robin Le Poidevin examines how we perceive time and change, the means by which memory links us with the past, the attempt to represent change and movement in art, and the nature of fictional time. These apparently disparate questions all concern the ways in which we represent aspects of time, in thought, experience, art and fiction. They also raise fundamental problems for our philosophical understanding, both of mental representation, and of the nature of time itself. Le Poidevin brings together issues in philosophy, psychology, aesthetics, and literary theory in examining the mechanisms underlying our representation of time in various media, and brings these to bear on metaphysical debates over the real nature of time. These debates concern which aspects of time are genuinely part of time's intrinsic nature, and which, in some sense, are mind-dependent. Arguably, the most important debate concerns time's passage: does time pass in reality, or is the division of events into past, present, and future simply a reflection of our temporal perspective - a result of the interaction between a 'static' world and minds capable of representing it? Le Poidevin argues that, contrary to what perception and memory lead us to suppose, time does not really pass, and this surprising conclusion can be reconciled with the characteristic features of temporal experience.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [180]-187) and index.

PART I: ASPECTS OF TIME AND REPRESENTATION; 1. The Project; 2. Causal Theories of Representation; 3. Egocentric and Objective Representation; PART II: MEMORY AND PERCEPTION; 4. Retracing the Past: Memory and Passage; 5. Projecting the Present: The Shock of the Now; 6. The Wider View: Precedence and Duration; PART III: ART AND FICTION; 7. Image and Instant: The Pictorial Representation of Time; 8. The Fictional Future; 9. The Unity of Time and Narrative; Conclusion

The Images of Time presents a philosophical investigation of the nature of time and the mind's ways of representing it. Robin Le Poidevin examines how we perceive time and change, the means by which memory links us with the past, the attempt to represent change and movement in art, and the nature of fictional time. These apparently disparate questions all concern the ways in which we represent aspects of time, in thought, experience, art and fiction. They also raise fundamental problems for our philosophical understanding, both of mental representation, and of the nature of time itself. Le Poidevin brings together issues in philosophy, psychology, aesthetics, and literary theory in examining the mechanisms underlying our representation of time in various media, and brings these to bear on metaphysical debates over the real nature of time. These debates concern which aspects of time are genuinely part of time's intrinsic nature, and which, in some sense, are mind-dependent. Arguably, the most important debate concerns time's passage: does time pass in reality, or is the division of events into past, present, and future simply a reflection of our temporal perspective - a result of the interaction between a 'static' world and minds capable of representing it? Le Poidevin argues that, contrary to what perception and memory lead us to suppose, time does not really pass, and this surprising conclusion can be reconciled with the characteristic features of temporal experience.

Also available in printed form.

Electronic reproduction. Dawson Books. Mode of access: World Wide Web.