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Rethinking Rational Choice Theory [electronic resource] : A Companion on Rational and Moral Action.

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780230277151Publication details: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.ISBN:
  • 9780230355545
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rethinking Rational Choice Theory : A Companion on Rational and Moral ActionDDC classification:
  • 302.13
LOC classification:
  • HM495 .D884 2011
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Preface; Part I: Understanding Rational Behaviour; Introduction; I. Rational Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 Rational choice theory: an outline; 3 Utility, preference and welfare; 4 Rationality and self-interest; 5 'Das Adam Smith's Problem'; 6 Conclusion; II. Risky Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 Choice and risk; 3 Paradoxical choices; 4 Expected utility theory and market behaviour; 5 Expected utility theory: an evaluation; 6 Conclusion; III. Behavioural Economics; 1 Introduction; 2 Prospect theory and regret theory; 3 Behavioural economics; 4 Conclusion
2 Inclusive and exclusive accounts of well-being3 Commitment and identity; 4 Collective intentions; 5 Conclusion; XIII. Neuroscience and Moral Reasoning; 1 Introduction; 2 Moral dilemmas; 3 Reflections on the investigations; 4 Conclusion: moral judgments and moral theory; XIV. Rational and Moral Action; 1 Introduction; 2 Moral authority: is it real?; 3 Reasons and desires; 4 Consequential evaluation and responsible choice; 5 Conclusion; Part III: Principles of Justice; Introduction; XV. Justice as Impartiality; 1 Introduction; 2 Harsanyi's social welfare function; 3 Extended preferences
3 The Paretian welfare function4 Rights and liberties; 5 Conclusion; VII. Intentional Action and Situational Logic; 1 Introduction; 2 Internalist and externalist explanations of human action; 3 Rational choice explanations and folk psychology; 4 The failure of Belief-Desire explanations; 5 The model of situational analysis; 6 Conclusion: unity of method?; VIII. Rethinking Rational Choice Theory; 1 Introduction; 2 A different approach to choice behaviour; 3 Institutional individualism; 4 Neuroeconomics and gene-culture co-evolution; 5 Ethics and economics; Part II: How to Choose; Introduction
4 The impartial observer theorem
IV. Neuroeconomics1 Introduction; 2 Neuroeconomics and brain imaging; 3 The reception of neuroeconomics in economic science; 4 The dual system hypothesis; 5 Brain and mind; 6 Mind and consciousness; 7 Conscious and unconscious thought; 8 The triumph of unconscious thought?; 9 Conclusion; V. Strategic Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 How to play games; 3 Which games to play?; 4 Solutions to games; 5 Classical game theory: some conclusions; 6 Evolutionary game theory; 7 Behavioural game theory; 8 Conclusion; VI. Social Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 From welfare economics to social choice theory
IX. A Proper Choice1 Introduction; 2 The value of preferences; 3 Valuations and the naturalistic fallacy; 4 Symbolic utility; 5 Conclusion; X. Are Justifying Reasons Motivating?; 1 Introduction; 2 Internal and external reasons; 3 The subjective motivational set; 4 Motivated desires and motivating reasons; 5 Conclusion; XI. Framing and Ranking; 1 Introduction; 2 Aspect orderings and meta-rankings; 3 Conflicting values and multiple rankings; 4 Utilitarian consequentialism and moral considerations; 5 Conflicting desires and meta-preferences; 6 Conclusion; XII. Commitment; 1 Introduction
Summary: The marriage of neuroscience and the science of choice behaviour gave birth to neuroeconomics. Jan de Jong explores this new discipline, investigating the relationship between choice behaviour and brain activity, and the light that this sheds on our systems of reasoning.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Preface; Part I: Understanding Rational Behaviour; Introduction; I. Rational Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 Rational choice theory: an outline; 3 Utility, preference and welfare; 4 Rationality and self-interest; 5 'Das Adam Smith's Problem'; 6 Conclusion; II. Risky Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 Choice and risk; 3 Paradoxical choices; 4 Expected utility theory and market behaviour; 5 Expected utility theory: an evaluation; 6 Conclusion; III. Behavioural Economics; 1 Introduction; 2 Prospect theory and regret theory; 3 Behavioural economics; 4 Conclusion

2 Inclusive and exclusive accounts of well-being3 Commitment and identity; 4 Collective intentions; 5 Conclusion; XIII. Neuroscience and Moral Reasoning; 1 Introduction; 2 Moral dilemmas; 3 Reflections on the investigations; 4 Conclusion: moral judgments and moral theory; XIV. Rational and Moral Action; 1 Introduction; 2 Moral authority: is it real?; 3 Reasons and desires; 4 Consequential evaluation and responsible choice; 5 Conclusion; Part III: Principles of Justice; Introduction; XV. Justice as Impartiality; 1 Introduction; 2 Harsanyi's social welfare function; 3 Extended preferences

3 The Paretian welfare function4 Rights and liberties; 5 Conclusion; VII. Intentional Action and Situational Logic; 1 Introduction; 2 Internalist and externalist explanations of human action; 3 Rational choice explanations and folk psychology; 4 The failure of Belief-Desire explanations; 5 The model of situational analysis; 6 Conclusion: unity of method?; VIII. Rethinking Rational Choice Theory; 1 Introduction; 2 A different approach to choice behaviour; 3 Institutional individualism; 4 Neuroeconomics and gene-culture co-evolution; 5 Ethics and economics; Part II: How to Choose; Introduction

4 The impartial observer theorem

IV. Neuroeconomics1 Introduction; 2 Neuroeconomics and brain imaging; 3 The reception of neuroeconomics in economic science; 4 The dual system hypothesis; 5 Brain and mind; 6 Mind and consciousness; 7 Conscious and unconscious thought; 8 The triumph of unconscious thought?; 9 Conclusion; V. Strategic Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 How to play games; 3 Which games to play?; 4 Solutions to games; 5 Classical game theory: some conclusions; 6 Evolutionary game theory; 7 Behavioural game theory; 8 Conclusion; VI. Social Choice; 1 Introduction; 2 From welfare economics to social choice theory

IX. A Proper Choice1 Introduction; 2 The value of preferences; 3 Valuations and the naturalistic fallacy; 4 Symbolic utility; 5 Conclusion; X. Are Justifying Reasons Motivating?; 1 Introduction; 2 Internal and external reasons; 3 The subjective motivational set; 4 Motivated desires and motivating reasons; 5 Conclusion; XI. Framing and Ranking; 1 Introduction; 2 Aspect orderings and meta-rankings; 3 Conflicting values and multiple rankings; 4 Utilitarian consequentialism and moral considerations; 5 Conflicting desires and meta-preferences; 6 Conclusion; XII. Commitment; 1 Introduction

The marriage of neuroscience and the science of choice behaviour gave birth to neuroeconomics. Jan de Jong explores this new discipline, investigating the relationship between choice behaviour and brain activity, and the light that this sheds on our systems of reasoning.