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Last Best Gifts [electronic resource] : Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and Organs

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780226322377Publication details: Chicago, IL : University of Chicago Press, 2010.ISBN:
  • 9780226322384
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Last Best Gifts : Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and OrgansDDC classification:
  • 362.17/84 362.1783 362.1784
LOC classification:
  • RD129.5 .H43 2010
  • RD129.5.H43 2006
Online resources:
Contents:
Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; 1. Exchange in Human Goods; 2. Making a Gift; 3. The Logistics of Altruism; 4. Collection Regimes and Donor Populations; 5. Organizations and Obligations; 6. Managing Gifts, Making Markets; Appendix: Data Sources and Methods; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: More than any other altruistic gesture, blood and organ donation exemplifies the true spirit of self-sacrifice. Donors literally give of themselves for no reward so that the life of an individual-often anonymous-may be spared. But as the demand for blood and organs has grown, the value of a system that depends solely on gifts has been called into question, and the possibility has surfaced that donors might be supplemented or replaced by paid suppliers. Last Best Gifts offers a fresh perspective on this ethical dilemma by examining the social organization of bl
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; 1. Exchange in Human Goods; 2. Making a Gift; 3. The Logistics of Altruism; 4. Collection Regimes and Donor Populations; 5. Organizations and Obligations; 6. Managing Gifts, Making Markets; Appendix: Data Sources and Methods; Notes; Bibliography; Index

More than any other altruistic gesture, blood and organ donation exemplifies the true spirit of self-sacrifice. Donors literally give of themselves for no reward so that the life of an individual-often anonymous-may be spared. But as the demand for blood and organs has grown, the value of a system that depends solely on gifts has been called into question, and the possibility has surfaced that donors might be supplemented or replaced by paid suppliers. Last Best Gifts offers a fresh perspective on this ethical dilemma by examining the social organization of bl