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Renaissance Romance [electronic resource] : The Transformation of English Prose Fiction, 1570?1620

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781409410133Publication details: Farnham : Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2011.ISBN:
  • 9781409410140
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Renaissance Romance : The Transformation of English Prose Fiction, 1570?1620DDC classification:
  • 823.309 828.08
LOC classification:
  • PR836 .D27 2011
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Note on the Transcription of Texts; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 Wandering Knights: Romance at Court; 2 Sidney's Arcadian Expectations; 3 Errant Scholars: The Travails of Mercenary Printing; 4 The Tales of 'Robin Greene'; 5 Deviant Women: Fiction in Other Hands; 6 'Dancing in a Net': Mary Wroth's Urania; Afterword; Selected Works Cited; Index
Summary: Renaissance Romance examines how and why the fears and expectations surrounding the old genre of romance resonated in early modern England. Examining a range of texts and the fiction of Sir Philip Sidney, Robert Greene and Lady Mary Wroth in particular, Das illustrates the sheer cultural persistence of romance, and reveals how a generational consciousness inherent in the genre transformed the new prose fiction of the period.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Note on the Transcription of Texts; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 Wandering Knights: Romance at Court; 2 Sidney's Arcadian Expectations; 3 Errant Scholars: The Travails of Mercenary Printing; 4 The Tales of 'Robin Greene'; 5 Deviant Women: Fiction in Other Hands; 6 'Dancing in a Net': Mary Wroth's Urania; Afterword; Selected Works Cited; Index

Renaissance Romance examines how and why the fears and expectations surrounding the old genre of romance resonated in early modern England. Examining a range of texts and the fiction of Sir Philip Sidney, Robert Greene and Lady Mary Wroth in particular, Das illustrates the sheer cultural persistence of romance, and reveals how a generational consciousness inherent in the genre transformed the new prose fiction of the period.