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Hearsay Evidence in Criminal Proceedings [electronic resource].

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781841138121Series: Criminal Law LibraryPublication details: Oxford : Hart, 2008.ISBN:
  • 9781847314314
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hearsay Evidence in Criminal ProceedingsDDC classification:
  • 345.42064
LOC classification:
  • KD7525.S64 2008
Online resources:
Contents:
Half title page; Title page; Title verso; Preface; Contents; Abbreviations; Table of Cases; Table of Legislation; Table of Treaties; 1 Introduction; 2 Hearsay and the European Convention on Human Rights; 3 The Scope of the Reform, the Shape of the New Exclusionary Rule and the New Scheme of Exceptions; 4 Hearsay Admitted by Agreement; 5 The 'Inclusionary Discretion' and the General Discretion to Exclude; 6 Statements of Witnesses who are Unavailable (CJA 2003, Section 116); 7 Documentary Hearsay (CJA 2003, Section 117); 8 Other Statutory Exceptions
9 Preserved Common Law Exceptions (CJA 2003, Section 118)10 Confessions (and Other Extra- Judicial Statements by Defendants); 11 Multiple Hearsay; 12 The Rule Against Narrative; 13 Videotaped Evidence-in-Chief; 14 Other Matters: Experts (CJA 2003, Section 127) and Proof of Documents (Section 133); 15 Practical Issues; Appendix I; Appendix II; Appendix III; Appendix IV; Index
Summary: The Criminal Justice Act 2003 re-wrote the hearsay evidence rule for the purpose of criminal proceedings, enacting the recommendations of the Law Commission together with some proposals from the Auld Review. Since the new provisions came into force a body of case-law has interpreted them and, in particular, given guidance as to how the new 'inclusionary discretion'. should be exercised. Following the style of his earlier book about the new law on bad character evidence, the central part of Professor Spencer's book on hearsay evidence consists of section-by-section commentary on the relevant pr
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Half title page; Title page; Title verso; Preface; Contents; Abbreviations; Table of Cases; Table of Legislation; Table of Treaties; 1 Introduction; 2 Hearsay and the European Convention on Human Rights; 3 The Scope of the Reform, the Shape of the New Exclusionary Rule and the New Scheme of Exceptions; 4 Hearsay Admitted by Agreement; 5 The 'Inclusionary Discretion' and the General Discretion to Exclude; 6 Statements of Witnesses who are Unavailable (CJA 2003, Section 116); 7 Documentary Hearsay (CJA 2003, Section 117); 8 Other Statutory Exceptions

9 Preserved Common Law Exceptions (CJA 2003, Section 118)10 Confessions (and Other Extra- Judicial Statements by Defendants); 11 Multiple Hearsay; 12 The Rule Against Narrative; 13 Videotaped Evidence-in-Chief; 14 Other Matters: Experts (CJA 2003, Section 127) and Proof of Documents (Section 133); 15 Practical Issues; Appendix I; Appendix II; Appendix III; Appendix IV; Index

The Criminal Justice Act 2003 re-wrote the hearsay evidence rule for the purpose of criminal proceedings, enacting the recommendations of the Law Commission together with some proposals from the Auld Review. Since the new provisions came into force a body of case-law has interpreted them and, in particular, given guidance as to how the new 'inclusionary discretion'. should be exercised. Following the style of his earlier book about the new law on bad character evidence, the central part of Professor Spencer's book on hearsay evidence consists of section-by-section commentary on the relevant pr