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Designing with the Mind in Mind [electronic resource] : Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design Rules

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780123750303Publication details: Burlington : Elsevier Science, 2010.ISBN:
  • 9780080963020
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Designing with the Mind in Mind : Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design RulesDDC classification:
  • 005.4/37 005.437019
LOC classification:
  • QA76.9.U83 J634 2010
Online resources:
Contents:
Front Cover; Designing with the Mind in Mind: Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design Rules; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Foreword; Introduction; 1 We Perceive What We Expect; PERCEPTION BIASED BY EXPERIENCE; PERCEPTION BIASED BY CURRENT CONTEXT; PERCEPTION BIASED BY GOALS; DESIGN IMPLICATIONS; 2 Our Vision is Optimized to See Structure; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: PROXIMITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: SIMILARITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: CONTINUITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: CLOSURE; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: SYMMETRY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: FIGURE/GROUND; GESTALT PRINCIPLES: COMMON FATE
A MODERN VIEW OF MEMORYCHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT-TERM MEMORY; IMPLICATIONS OF SHORT-TERM MEMORY CHARACTERISTICS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY; IMPLICATIONS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY CHARACTERISTICS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; 8 Limits on Attention, Shape, Thought and Action; WE FOCUS ON OUR GOALS AND PAY LITTLE ATTENTION TO OUR TOOLS; WE USE EXTERNAL AIDS TO KEEP TRACK OF WHAT WE ARE DOING; WE FOLLOW INFORMATION ""SCENT"" TOWARD OUR GOAL; WE PREFER FAMILIAR PATHS; OUR THOUGHT CYCLE: GOAL, EXECUTE, EVALUATE
AFTER WE ACHIEVE A TASK'S PRIMARY GOAL, WE OFTEN FORGET CLEANUP STEPS9 Recognition are Easy; Recall is Hard; RECOGNITION IS EASY; RECALL IS HARD; RECOGNITION VERSUS RECALL: IMPLICATIONS FOR UI DESIGN; 10 Learning from Experience and Performing Learned Actions are Easy; Problem Solving and Calculation are Hard; WE HAVE THREE BRAINS; LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE IS (USUALLY) EASY; PERFORMING LEARNED ACTIONS IS EASY; PROBLEM SOLVING AND CALCULATION ARE HARD; IMPLICATIONS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; ANSWERS TO PUZZLES ON PAGES 124 AND 125; 11 Many Factors Affect Learning
GESTALT PRINCIPLES: COMBINED3 We Seek and Use Visual Structure; STRUCTURE ENHANCES PEOPLE'S ABILITY TO SCAN LONG NUMBERS; DATA-SPECIFIC CONTROLS PROVIDE EVEN MORE STRUCTURE; VISUAL HIERARCHY LETS PEOPLE FOCUS ON THE RELEVANT INFORMATION; 4 Reading is Unnatural; WE'RE WIRED FOR LANGUAGE, BUT NOT FOR READING; IS READING FEATURE-DRIVEN OR CONTEXT-DRIVEN?; SKILLED AND UNSKILLED READING USES DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE BRAIN; POOR INFORMATION DESIGN CAN DISRUPT READING; MUCH OF THE READING REQUIRED BY SOFTWARE IS UNNECESSARY; TEST ON REAL USERS; 5 Our Color Vision is Limited; HOW COLOR VISION WORKS
VISION IS OPTIMIZED FOR EDGE CONTRAST, NOT BRIGHTNESSABILITY TO DISCRIMINATE COLORS DEPENDS ON HOW COLORS ARE PRESENTED; COLOR-BLINDNESS; EXTERNAL FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE ABILITY TO DISTINGUISH COLORS; GUIDELINES FOR USING COLOR; 6 Our Peripheral Vision is Poor; RESOLUTION OF THE FOVEA COMPARED TO THAT OF THE PERIPHERY; IS THE VISUAL PERIPHERY GOOD FOR ANYTHING?; EXAMPLES FROM COMPUTER USER INTERFACES; COMMON METHODS OF MAKING MESSAGES VISIBLE; HEAVY ARTILLERY FOR MAKING USERS NOTICE MESSAGES: USE SPARINGLY; 7 Our Attention is Limited; Our Memory is Imperfect; SHORT VS. LONG-TERM MEMORY
WE LEARN FASTER WHEN OPERATION IS TASK-FOCUSED, SIMPLE, AND CONSISTENT
Summary: User interface (UI) design rules and guidelines, developed by early HCI gurus and recognized throughout the field, were based on cognitive psychology (study of mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language), and early practitioners were well informed of its tenants. But today, practitioners with backgrounds in cognitive psychology are a minority, as user interface designers and developers enter the field from a wide array of disciplines. HCI practitioners today have enough experience in UI design that they have been exposed to UI design rules, but it is essential that they un
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Front Cover; Designing with the Mind in Mind: Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design Rules; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Foreword; Introduction; 1 We Perceive What We Expect; PERCEPTION BIASED BY EXPERIENCE; PERCEPTION BIASED BY CURRENT CONTEXT; PERCEPTION BIASED BY GOALS; DESIGN IMPLICATIONS; 2 Our Vision is Optimized to See Structure; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: PROXIMITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: SIMILARITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: CONTINUITY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: CLOSURE; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: SYMMETRY; GESTALT PRINCIPLE: FIGURE/GROUND; GESTALT PRINCIPLES: COMMON FATE

A MODERN VIEW OF MEMORYCHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT-TERM MEMORY; IMPLICATIONS OF SHORT-TERM MEMORY CHARACTERISTICS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY; IMPLICATIONS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY CHARACTERISTICS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; 8 Limits on Attention, Shape, Thought and Action; WE FOCUS ON OUR GOALS AND PAY LITTLE ATTENTION TO OUR TOOLS; WE USE EXTERNAL AIDS TO KEEP TRACK OF WHAT WE ARE DOING; WE FOLLOW INFORMATION ""SCENT"" TOWARD OUR GOAL; WE PREFER FAMILIAR PATHS; OUR THOUGHT CYCLE: GOAL, EXECUTE, EVALUATE

AFTER WE ACHIEVE A TASK'S PRIMARY GOAL, WE OFTEN FORGET CLEANUP STEPS9 Recognition are Easy; Recall is Hard; RECOGNITION IS EASY; RECALL IS HARD; RECOGNITION VERSUS RECALL: IMPLICATIONS FOR UI DESIGN; 10 Learning from Experience and Performing Learned Actions are Easy; Problem Solving and Calculation are Hard; WE HAVE THREE BRAINS; LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE IS (USUALLY) EASY; PERFORMING LEARNED ACTIONS IS EASY; PROBLEM SOLVING AND CALCULATION ARE HARD; IMPLICATIONS FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN; ANSWERS TO PUZZLES ON PAGES 124 AND 125; 11 Many Factors Affect Learning

GESTALT PRINCIPLES: COMBINED3 We Seek and Use Visual Structure; STRUCTURE ENHANCES PEOPLE'S ABILITY TO SCAN LONG NUMBERS; DATA-SPECIFIC CONTROLS PROVIDE EVEN MORE STRUCTURE; VISUAL HIERARCHY LETS PEOPLE FOCUS ON THE RELEVANT INFORMATION; 4 Reading is Unnatural; WE'RE WIRED FOR LANGUAGE, BUT NOT FOR READING; IS READING FEATURE-DRIVEN OR CONTEXT-DRIVEN?; SKILLED AND UNSKILLED READING USES DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE BRAIN; POOR INFORMATION DESIGN CAN DISRUPT READING; MUCH OF THE READING REQUIRED BY SOFTWARE IS UNNECESSARY; TEST ON REAL USERS; 5 Our Color Vision is Limited; HOW COLOR VISION WORKS

VISION IS OPTIMIZED FOR EDGE CONTRAST, NOT BRIGHTNESSABILITY TO DISCRIMINATE COLORS DEPENDS ON HOW COLORS ARE PRESENTED; COLOR-BLINDNESS; EXTERNAL FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE ABILITY TO DISTINGUISH COLORS; GUIDELINES FOR USING COLOR; 6 Our Peripheral Vision is Poor; RESOLUTION OF THE FOVEA COMPARED TO THAT OF THE PERIPHERY; IS THE VISUAL PERIPHERY GOOD FOR ANYTHING?; EXAMPLES FROM COMPUTER USER INTERFACES; COMMON METHODS OF MAKING MESSAGES VISIBLE; HEAVY ARTILLERY FOR MAKING USERS NOTICE MESSAGES: USE SPARINGLY; 7 Our Attention is Limited; Our Memory is Imperfect; SHORT VS. LONG-TERM MEMORY

WE LEARN FASTER WHEN OPERATION IS TASK-FOCUSED, SIMPLE, AND CONSISTENT

User interface (UI) design rules and guidelines, developed by early HCI gurus and recognized throughout the field, were based on cognitive psychology (study of mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language), and early practitioners were well informed of its tenants. But today, practitioners with backgrounds in cognitive psychology are a minority, as user interface designers and developers enter the field from a wide array of disciplines. HCI practitioners today have enough experience in UI design that they have been exposed to UI design rules, but it is essential that they un