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Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks [electronic resource].

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781461421726Series: SpringerBriefs in Electrical and Computer EngineeringPublication details: Dordrecht : Springer, 2012.ISBN:
  • 9781461421733
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Low-Power Wireless Sensor NetworksDDC classification:
  • 621.3815
LOC classification:
  • TK7872 .D48 L69 2012
Online resources:
Contents:
Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks; Preface; Contents; Acronyms; Chapter 1 Low-power WSN Technology; 1.1 WSN and OtherWireless Technologies; 1.2 Characteristics of Low-power WSNs; 1.3 Quality of Service Requirements; 1.4 Services for Sensing and Actuation Applications; References; Chapter 2 Key Standards and Industry Specifications; 2.1 IEEE 802.15 Standard Family; 2.2 ZigBee; 2.3 6LoWPAN; 2.4 Z-Wave; 2.5 WirelessHART and ISA100.11a; 2.6 Bluetooth Low Energy; 2.7 ANT and ANT+; 2.8 ONE-NET; 2.9 DASH7; 2.10 IEEE 1902.1; 2.11 IEEE 1451; References; Chapter 3 Hardware Platforms and Components
3.1 Communication subsystem3.2 Computing subsystem; 3.3 Sensing subsystem; 3.4 Power subsystem; 3.4.1 Energy Storage; 3.4.2 Energy Scavenging; 3.4.3 Voltage Regulators; 3.5 Existing Platforms; References; Chapter 4 Communication Protocols; 4.1 Medium Access Control Features and Services; 4.1.1 Low-Energy MAC Design; 4.1.2 MAC Technologies; 4.1.3 Unsynchronized Low Duty-Cycle MAC Protocols; 4.1.4 Synchronized Low Duty-Cycle MAC Protocols; 4.1.5 Performance Comparison; 4.2 Routing Paradigms and Techniques; 4.2.1 Node-centric Routing; 4.2.2 Data-centric Routing; 4.2.3 Location-based Routing
4.2.4 Multipath Routing4.2.5 Cost-based Routing; 4.3 Transport Protocols; References; Chapter 5 Software and Middleware Services; 5.1 Sensor Operating Systems; 5.1.1 Implementation Approaches; 5.1.2 Existing Operating Systems; 5.2 Middlewares; 5.3 Localization; 5.3.1 RF-based Localization; 5.3.2 Localization with Ultrasound; 5.3.3 Localization with Infrared; 5.3.4 Data Fusion; 5.4 Time Synchronization; 5.4.1 Tree-Based Time Synchronization; 5.4.2 Flooding-Based Time Synchronization; 5.4.3 Reference Broadcasting; 5.4.4 Co-operative Time Synchronization; 5.4.5 Delay-Based Time Synchronization
ReferencesChapter 6 Sensor Data Collection; 6.1 Gateway Interfaces; 6.2 Data Collection Services; 6.2.1 Sensor Web Enablement; 6.2.2 Research proposals; 6.3 6LoWPAN; 6.4 Deployment Support and Diagnostics; 6.4.1 Passive monitoring; 6.4.2 Deployment Support Networks; 6.4.3 In-Network Diagnostics; References; Chapter 7 Experiments; 7.1 Low-Energy TUTWSN; 7.1.1 Scalability; 7.1.2 Power Consumption; 7.1.3 Availability and End-to-end Reliability; 7.2 Low-Latency TUTWSN; 7.2.1 Power Consumption and Network Lifetime; 7.2.2 Delay and Throughput; References; Chapter 8 Summary; Index
Summary: Wireless sensor network (WSN) is an ad-hoc network technology comprising even thousands of autonomic and self-organizing nodes that combine environmental sensing, data processing, and wireless networking. The applications for sensor networks range from home and industrial environments to military uses. Unlike the traditional computer networks, a WSN is application-oriented and deployed for a specific task. WSNs are data centric, which means that messages are not send to individual nodes but to geographical locations or regions based on the data content. A WSN node is typically battery powered
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks; Preface; Contents; Acronyms; Chapter 1 Low-power WSN Technology; 1.1 WSN and OtherWireless Technologies; 1.2 Characteristics of Low-power WSNs; 1.3 Quality of Service Requirements; 1.4 Services for Sensing and Actuation Applications; References; Chapter 2 Key Standards and Industry Specifications; 2.1 IEEE 802.15 Standard Family; 2.2 ZigBee; 2.3 6LoWPAN; 2.4 Z-Wave; 2.5 WirelessHART and ISA100.11a; 2.6 Bluetooth Low Energy; 2.7 ANT and ANT+; 2.8 ONE-NET; 2.9 DASH7; 2.10 IEEE 1902.1; 2.11 IEEE 1451; References; Chapter 3 Hardware Platforms and Components

3.1 Communication subsystem3.2 Computing subsystem; 3.3 Sensing subsystem; 3.4 Power subsystem; 3.4.1 Energy Storage; 3.4.2 Energy Scavenging; 3.4.3 Voltage Regulators; 3.5 Existing Platforms; References; Chapter 4 Communication Protocols; 4.1 Medium Access Control Features and Services; 4.1.1 Low-Energy MAC Design; 4.1.2 MAC Technologies; 4.1.3 Unsynchronized Low Duty-Cycle MAC Protocols; 4.1.4 Synchronized Low Duty-Cycle MAC Protocols; 4.1.5 Performance Comparison; 4.2 Routing Paradigms and Techniques; 4.2.1 Node-centric Routing; 4.2.2 Data-centric Routing; 4.2.3 Location-based Routing

4.2.4 Multipath Routing4.2.5 Cost-based Routing; 4.3 Transport Protocols; References; Chapter 5 Software and Middleware Services; 5.1 Sensor Operating Systems; 5.1.1 Implementation Approaches; 5.1.2 Existing Operating Systems; 5.2 Middlewares; 5.3 Localization; 5.3.1 RF-based Localization; 5.3.2 Localization with Ultrasound; 5.3.3 Localization with Infrared; 5.3.4 Data Fusion; 5.4 Time Synchronization; 5.4.1 Tree-Based Time Synchronization; 5.4.2 Flooding-Based Time Synchronization; 5.4.3 Reference Broadcasting; 5.4.4 Co-operative Time Synchronization; 5.4.5 Delay-Based Time Synchronization

ReferencesChapter 6 Sensor Data Collection; 6.1 Gateway Interfaces; 6.2 Data Collection Services; 6.2.1 Sensor Web Enablement; 6.2.2 Research proposals; 6.3 6LoWPAN; 6.4 Deployment Support and Diagnostics; 6.4.1 Passive monitoring; 6.4.2 Deployment Support Networks; 6.4.3 In-Network Diagnostics; References; Chapter 7 Experiments; 7.1 Low-Energy TUTWSN; 7.1.1 Scalability; 7.1.2 Power Consumption; 7.1.3 Availability and End-to-end Reliability; 7.2 Low-Latency TUTWSN; 7.2.1 Power Consumption and Network Lifetime; 7.2.2 Delay and Throughput; References; Chapter 8 Summary; Index

Wireless sensor network (WSN) is an ad-hoc network technology comprising even thousands of autonomic and self-organizing nodes that combine environmental sensing, data processing, and wireless networking. The applications for sensor networks range from home and industrial environments to military uses. Unlike the traditional computer networks, a WSN is application-oriented and deployed for a specific task. WSNs are data centric, which means that messages are not send to individual nodes but to geographical locations or regions based on the data content. A WSN node is typically battery powered