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Luxury Brand Management [electronic resource] : A World of Privilege

By: Contributor(s): Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781118171769Publication details: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, 2012.Edition: 2nd edISBN:
  • 9781118171776
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Luxury Brand Management : A World of PrivilegeDDC classification:
  • 658.827
LOC classification:
  • HD69.B7 C473
Online resources:
Contents:
Luxury Brand Management: A World of Privilege; Contents; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Concept of Luxury; A Problematic Definition; The Paradox of Contemporary Luxury; Chronicle of a Semantic Evolution; Modern Dispersion; Etymology and Transformations; The Advent of Intermediate Luxury; Classification of Existing Definitions; Perceptual Approaches; Productive Approaches; Social and Individual Aspects; The Brand and Its Manifestations; Luxury Values; The Three Scales; The Semiotic Square of Consumption Values; True Luxury, Intermediate Luxury; Eccentric Luxury; Reasonable Luxury
Authentic LuxuryLuxury, Being and Appearing; The Square of Veracity; Five Sources of Legitimacy; Conclusion; Notes; Chapter 2: Specificities of the Luxury Industry; What Is So Different About the Luxury Goods Industry?; Company Size; Sales Figures Are Difficult to Compare; Limited Number of Staff; Financial Characteristics; A Very High Break-Even; A Limited Cash Need; Time Frame; The Fashion Cycle; Turnaround Time; The Key to Success in Luxury Goods; The Need for a Strong Name; Brand Extension and Legitimacy; Identifiable Products; The Primacy of Design; The Raison d'Être
Chapter 4: The Power of the Luxury Brand
Perfumes and CosmeticsThe Market; Consumer Expectations; Product Types; The Financial Aspect; The Major Operators; The Major Brands; The Major Corporations; Is There Room for Outsiders?; Key Management Issues; Sophisticated Marketing; Worldwide Advertising and Promotion; Managing Distribution Networks; Organizational Structures; Wines and Spirits; The Wine and Spirits Market; The Brown Products; The White Products; Champagnes; Other Categories; The Major Operators; The Major Brands; The Major Corporations; Key Management Issues; Dealing with Mass Merchandisers
The Need for a Worldwide StructureFinancing Inventories; The Need for Pull Marketing; Organizational Structures; The Watch and Jewelry Market; The Market; The Jewelry Market; The Watch Market; The Major Operators; The Jewelry Brands; The Watch Brands; Key Management Issues; Retail versus Wholesale; Pricing and Product Lines; The Risk of the Major Customer; Organizational Structures; The Leather Goods Market; The Market; Ladies' Handbags; Luggage; Small Leather Goods; The Major Operators; Key Management Issues; The World of Hotels and Hospitality; Conclusion
The Social and Cultural EnvironmentKeeping Up with Social Trends; The Response to Changing Trends; The Major Operators; What Is the Size of the Luxury Market?; Oligopoly or Open Market?; The Big Three Corporations; LVMH; Richemont; PPR Gucci; Can the Single-Brand Company Survive?; Note; Chapter 3: Major Luxury Sectors; Ready-to-Wear Activities; The Fashion Business and Its Operation; The Players; How to Develop a Brand; How to Make Money; Key Management Issues; The Creative Process; A Worldwide Presence; Why Is It Difficult to Make Money?; The Most Common Organizational Structure
Summary: The definitive guide to managing a luxury brand, newly revised and updated What defines a luxury brand? Traditional wisdom suggests that it's one that's selective and exclusive-to such a degree that only one brand can exist within each retail category (automobiles, fragrances, cosmetics, etc.). But this definition is inherently restrictive, failing to take into account the way in which luxury brands today are increasingly identified as such by their placement in stores and how consumers perceive them. This revised and updated edition of Luxury Brand Management, the first compre
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Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Luxury Brand Management: A World of Privilege; Contents; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Concept of Luxury; A Problematic Definition; The Paradox of Contemporary Luxury; Chronicle of a Semantic Evolution; Modern Dispersion; Etymology and Transformations; The Advent of Intermediate Luxury; Classification of Existing Definitions; Perceptual Approaches; Productive Approaches; Social and Individual Aspects; The Brand and Its Manifestations; Luxury Values; The Three Scales; The Semiotic Square of Consumption Values; True Luxury, Intermediate Luxury; Eccentric Luxury; Reasonable Luxury

Authentic LuxuryLuxury, Being and Appearing; The Square of Veracity; Five Sources of Legitimacy; Conclusion; Notes; Chapter 2: Specificities of the Luxury Industry; What Is So Different About the Luxury Goods Industry?; Company Size; Sales Figures Are Difficult to Compare; Limited Number of Staff; Financial Characteristics; A Very High Break-Even; A Limited Cash Need; Time Frame; The Fashion Cycle; Turnaround Time; The Key to Success in Luxury Goods; The Need for a Strong Name; Brand Extension and Legitimacy; Identifiable Products; The Primacy of Design; The Raison d'Être

Chapter 4: The Power of the Luxury Brand

Perfumes and CosmeticsThe Market; Consumer Expectations; Product Types; The Financial Aspect; The Major Operators; The Major Brands; The Major Corporations; Is There Room for Outsiders?; Key Management Issues; Sophisticated Marketing; Worldwide Advertising and Promotion; Managing Distribution Networks; Organizational Structures; Wines and Spirits; The Wine and Spirits Market; The Brown Products; The White Products; Champagnes; Other Categories; The Major Operators; The Major Brands; The Major Corporations; Key Management Issues; Dealing with Mass Merchandisers

The Need for a Worldwide StructureFinancing Inventories; The Need for Pull Marketing; Organizational Structures; The Watch and Jewelry Market; The Market; The Jewelry Market; The Watch Market; The Major Operators; The Jewelry Brands; The Watch Brands; Key Management Issues; Retail versus Wholesale; Pricing and Product Lines; The Risk of the Major Customer; Organizational Structures; The Leather Goods Market; The Market; Ladies' Handbags; Luggage; Small Leather Goods; The Major Operators; Key Management Issues; The World of Hotels and Hospitality; Conclusion

The Social and Cultural EnvironmentKeeping Up with Social Trends; The Response to Changing Trends; The Major Operators; What Is the Size of the Luxury Market?; Oligopoly or Open Market?; The Big Three Corporations; LVMH; Richemont; PPR Gucci; Can the Single-Brand Company Survive?; Note; Chapter 3: Major Luxury Sectors; Ready-to-Wear Activities; The Fashion Business and Its Operation; The Players; How to Develop a Brand; How to Make Money; Key Management Issues; The Creative Process; A Worldwide Presence; Why Is It Difficult to Make Money?; The Most Common Organizational Structure

The definitive guide to managing a luxury brand, newly revised and updated What defines a luxury brand? Traditional wisdom suggests that it's one that's selective and exclusive-to such a degree that only one brand can exist within each retail category (automobiles, fragrances, cosmetics, etc.). But this definition is inherently restrictive, failing to take into account the way in which luxury brands today are increasingly identified as such by their placement in stores and how consumers perceive them. This revised and updated edition of Luxury Brand Management, the first compre