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Systems Approaches to Managing Change [electronic resource] : A Practical Guide

By: Contributor(s): Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781848828087Publication details: Dordrecht : Springer, 2010.ISBN:
  • 9781848828094
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Systems Approaches to Managing Change : A Practical GuideDDC classification:
  • 004 658.4/06
LOC classification:
  • HD58.8
Online resources:
Contents:
Systems Approaches to Managing Change: A Practical Guide; Preface; Acknowledgements; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Introducing Systems Approaches; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The Way of the World; 1.2.1 Big, Big Issues; 1.2.2 Messes and Difficulties; 1.2.2.1 Is It a Mess or Is It Just Difficult?; 1.2.3 Traps in Conventional Thinking; 1.2.4 Systems Thinking Can Help; 1.2.4.1 Systems Are Social Constructs; 1.2.5 Two Aspects of Systems Thinking; 1.2.6 Perspectives on Systems Thinking
1.2.6.1 Perspective 1: Three Traditions of Systems Thinking (West Churchman, Peter Checkland, Werner Ulrich, Mike Jackson and Others)1.2.6.2 Perspective 2: Systems Thinking for Situations (Mike Jackson and Bob Flood); 1.2.6.3 Perspective 3: Influences Around Systems Approaches (Ray Ison and Paul Maiteny); 1.2.6.4 Perspective 4: Groupings of Systems Thinkers (Magnus Ramage and Karen Shipp); 1.2.7 Our Own Perspective; 1.2.7.1 Systems Approaches in Practice; 1.2.8 Purposeful Practice; 1.2.9 Five Approaches Described; 1.2.9.1 System Dynamics (SD) Authored by John Morecroft
1.2.9.2 Viable Systems Model (VSM) Authored by Patrick Hoverstadt1.2.9.3 Strategic Options Development and Analysis (SODA, with Cognitive Mapping) Authored by Fran Ackermann and Colin Eden; 1.2.9.4 Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) Authored by Peter Checkland and John Poulter; 1.2.9.5 Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) Authored by Werner Ulrich and Martin Reynolds; 1.2.10 Chapter Framework; References; Chapter 2: System Dynamics1; 2.1 Introduction; 2.1.1 Ways of Interpreting Situations in Business and Society; 2.1.2 Event-Oriented Thinking; 2.1.3 Feedback Systems Thinking
2.1.4 An Illustration of Feedback Systems Thinking2.1.5 A Shift of Mind; 2.2 Concepts and Tools of System Dynamics; 2.2.1 Causal Loop Diagrams, Feedback Structure and Behaviour Through Time; 2.2.1.1 Feedback Structure and the Dynamics of a Slow-to-Respond Shower; 2.2.1.2 Processes in a Shower 'System'; 2.2.1.3 Simulation of a Shower and the Dynamics of Balancing Loops; 2.2.2 From Events to Dynamics and Feedback Structure: Drug Related Crime; 2.2.2.1 Feedback Loops in Drug Related Crime; 2.2.2.2 Scope and Boundary of Factors in Drug Related Crime
2.2.2.3 An Aside: More Practice with Link Polarity and Loop Types2.2.2.4 Purpose and Use of Causal Loop Diagrams: A Summary; 2.2.2.5 Basic Tips: Picking and Naming Variables; 2.2.2.6 Basic Tips: Meaning of Arrows and Link Polarity; 2.2.2.7 Basic Tips: Drawing, Identifying and Naming Feedback Loops; 2.2.3 Modelling to Simulate Dynamic Systems; 2.2.3.1 Asset Stock Accumulation; 2.2.3.2 Accumulating a 'Stock' of Faculty at Greenfield University; 2.2.3.3 The Coordinating Network; 2.2.3.4 Modelling Symbols in Use: A Closer Look at Drug Related Crime; 2.2.4 Equation Formulations
2.2.4.1 Drug Related Crime
Summary: In a world of increasing complexity, instant information availability and constant flux, systems approaches provide the opportunity of a tangible anchor of purpose and iterate learning. The five approaches outlined in the book offer a range of interchangeable tools with rigorous frameworks of application tried and tested in the 'real world'. The frameworks of each approach form a powerful toolkit to explore the dynamics of how societies emerge, how organisations create viability, how to facilitate chains of argument through causal mapping, how to embrace a multiplicity of perspectives identify
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Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Systems Approaches to Managing Change: A Practical Guide; Preface; Acknowledgements; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Introducing Systems Approaches; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The Way of the World; 1.2.1 Big, Big Issues; 1.2.2 Messes and Difficulties; 1.2.2.1 Is It a Mess or Is It Just Difficult?; 1.2.3 Traps in Conventional Thinking; 1.2.4 Systems Thinking Can Help; 1.2.4.1 Systems Are Social Constructs; 1.2.5 Two Aspects of Systems Thinking; 1.2.6 Perspectives on Systems Thinking

1.2.6.1 Perspective 1: Three Traditions of Systems Thinking (West Churchman, Peter Checkland, Werner Ulrich, Mike Jackson and Others)1.2.6.2 Perspective 2: Systems Thinking for Situations (Mike Jackson and Bob Flood); 1.2.6.3 Perspective 3: Influences Around Systems Approaches (Ray Ison and Paul Maiteny); 1.2.6.4 Perspective 4: Groupings of Systems Thinkers (Magnus Ramage and Karen Shipp); 1.2.7 Our Own Perspective; 1.2.7.1 Systems Approaches in Practice; 1.2.8 Purposeful Practice; 1.2.9 Five Approaches Described; 1.2.9.1 System Dynamics (SD) Authored by John Morecroft

1.2.9.2 Viable Systems Model (VSM) Authored by Patrick Hoverstadt1.2.9.3 Strategic Options Development and Analysis (SODA, with Cognitive Mapping) Authored by Fran Ackermann and Colin Eden; 1.2.9.4 Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) Authored by Peter Checkland and John Poulter; 1.2.9.5 Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) Authored by Werner Ulrich and Martin Reynolds; 1.2.10 Chapter Framework; References; Chapter 2: System Dynamics1; 2.1 Introduction; 2.1.1 Ways of Interpreting Situations in Business and Society; 2.1.2 Event-Oriented Thinking; 2.1.3 Feedback Systems Thinking

2.1.4 An Illustration of Feedback Systems Thinking2.1.5 A Shift of Mind; 2.2 Concepts and Tools of System Dynamics; 2.2.1 Causal Loop Diagrams, Feedback Structure and Behaviour Through Time; 2.2.1.1 Feedback Structure and the Dynamics of a Slow-to-Respond Shower; 2.2.1.2 Processes in a Shower 'System'; 2.2.1.3 Simulation of a Shower and the Dynamics of Balancing Loops; 2.2.2 From Events to Dynamics and Feedback Structure: Drug Related Crime; 2.2.2.1 Feedback Loops in Drug Related Crime; 2.2.2.2 Scope and Boundary of Factors in Drug Related Crime

2.2.2.3 An Aside: More Practice with Link Polarity and Loop Types2.2.2.4 Purpose and Use of Causal Loop Diagrams: A Summary; 2.2.2.5 Basic Tips: Picking and Naming Variables; 2.2.2.6 Basic Tips: Meaning of Arrows and Link Polarity; 2.2.2.7 Basic Tips: Drawing, Identifying and Naming Feedback Loops; 2.2.3 Modelling to Simulate Dynamic Systems; 2.2.3.1 Asset Stock Accumulation; 2.2.3.2 Accumulating a 'Stock' of Faculty at Greenfield University; 2.2.3.3 The Coordinating Network; 2.2.3.4 Modelling Symbols in Use: A Closer Look at Drug Related Crime; 2.2.4 Equation Formulations

2.2.4.1 Drug Related Crime

In a world of increasing complexity, instant information availability and constant flux, systems approaches provide the opportunity of a tangible anchor of purpose and iterate learning. The five approaches outlined in the book offer a range of interchangeable tools with rigorous frameworks of application tried and tested in the 'real world'. The frameworks of each approach form a powerful toolkit to explore the dynamics of how societies emerge, how organisations create viability, how to facilitate chains of argument through causal mapping, how to embrace a multiplicity of perspectives identify