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Weight Management [electronic resource] : A Practitioner's Guide

By: Contributor(s): Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781405185592Publication details: Chicester : Wiley, 2012.ISBN:
  • 9781118343340
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Weight Management : A Practitioner's GuideDDC classification:
  • 613.25 616.3/98 616.398
LOC classification:
  • RC628 .P36 2012
Online resources:
Contents:
Weight Management: A Practitioner's Guide; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Section 1 Background Information; 1 Why Treat Obesity?; What is the scale of the obesity problem?; Why does it matter?; Obesity and early death; Obesity and type 2 diabetes; Obesity and cancer; Obesity and cardiovascular disease; Quality of life; Factors that increase the risk of obesity; Smoking cessation; Certain medications; Obesity and its causes; Why do practitioners need a good understanding of obesity causes?; What are the causes of obesity?; Biology and genes; Eating and activity behaviours
6 Building a Picture: The Assessment
An integrated approachKey strategies; Drug treatment; Surgical treatment; Conclusion; References; Section 2 Practical Application; 4 Preventing Overweight and Obesity; Prevention of overweight and obesity; Pre-conception and antenatal care; The early years; As life goes by; Medications; What to do?; If the response is negative; Support materials; Conclusion; References; 5 Providing A Person-centred Weight-management Service; Integrating a behavioural approach; Working in a person-centred way; How to integrate a behavioural approach in practice?; Identifying overweight and obesity
Interpreting BMIPlanning weight-management interventions in your setting; Aiming for a coordinated and structured approach; Deciding on the duration and frequency of appointments; How and when to begin conversations about weight; Exploring whether this is the right time to begin; More on motivation...; Is the patient really sure they have the time and commitment required?; Discussing and agreeing a way forward; Exploring treatment options; Lifestyle treatment; Group-based programmes; Commercial and self-help programmes; Drug treatment; Surgery; Conclusion; References
The obesogenic environmentHealth benefits of modest weight loss; Conclusion; References; 2 Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Obesity and its Management; What does the evidence say about discrimination and weight bias in society?; In employment; In education; In health care; Where does weight bias come from?; Media and TV images; Cultural factors; Beliefs about the causes of obesity; What are the consequences of weight bias?; Psychological consequences; Social and economic consequences; Physical consequences; What is the impact of weight bias in the health care setting?
What can we do to reduce weight bias?Conclusion; Reflective exercises; Recommendations for reducing weight bias in your practice; References; 3 Treatment Options: The Evidence for What Works; Introduction; Combined approaches; Dietary treatments; Eating frequency and patterns; Improving the quality of the diet; Low-fat diets; The 600 kcal deficit approach; Meal replacements; Very-low-calorie diets; Low-glycaemic-index diets; Low-carbohydrate diets; Fad diets; Physical-activity treatments; How much activity is needed?; Intensity and type of activity; Behaviour modification
Summary: An increasingly wide range of patients of different age, ethnicity and social background often combined with other clinical conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or osteoporosis now find themselves battling against obesity and many health professionals become frustrated, feeling ill-equipped to handle each unique case with the one-size-fits-all approach offered by the ""eat less, exercise more"" mantra. Weight Management: A Practitioner's Guide explains how effective evidence-based programmes structured in a manner addressing the key components of diet and physical activity integ
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Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Weight Management: A Practitioner's Guide; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Section 1 Background Information; 1 Why Treat Obesity?; What is the scale of the obesity problem?; Why does it matter?; Obesity and early death; Obesity and type 2 diabetes; Obesity and cancer; Obesity and cardiovascular disease; Quality of life; Factors that increase the risk of obesity; Smoking cessation; Certain medications; Obesity and its causes; Why do practitioners need a good understanding of obesity causes?; What are the causes of obesity?; Biology and genes; Eating and activity behaviours

6 Building a Picture: The Assessment

An integrated approachKey strategies; Drug treatment; Surgical treatment; Conclusion; References; Section 2 Practical Application; 4 Preventing Overweight and Obesity; Prevention of overweight and obesity; Pre-conception and antenatal care; The early years; As life goes by; Medications; What to do?; If the response is negative; Support materials; Conclusion; References; 5 Providing A Person-centred Weight-management Service; Integrating a behavioural approach; Working in a person-centred way; How to integrate a behavioural approach in practice?; Identifying overweight and obesity

Interpreting BMIPlanning weight-management interventions in your setting; Aiming for a coordinated and structured approach; Deciding on the duration and frequency of appointments; How and when to begin conversations about weight; Exploring whether this is the right time to begin; More on motivation...; Is the patient really sure they have the time and commitment required?; Discussing and agreeing a way forward; Exploring treatment options; Lifestyle treatment; Group-based programmes; Commercial and self-help programmes; Drug treatment; Surgery; Conclusion; References

The obesogenic environmentHealth benefits of modest weight loss; Conclusion; References; 2 Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Obesity and its Management; What does the evidence say about discrimination and weight bias in society?; In employment; In education; In health care; Where does weight bias come from?; Media and TV images; Cultural factors; Beliefs about the causes of obesity; What are the consequences of weight bias?; Psychological consequences; Social and economic consequences; Physical consequences; What is the impact of weight bias in the health care setting?

What can we do to reduce weight bias?Conclusion; Reflective exercises; Recommendations for reducing weight bias in your practice; References; 3 Treatment Options: The Evidence for What Works; Introduction; Combined approaches; Dietary treatments; Eating frequency and patterns; Improving the quality of the diet; Low-fat diets; The 600 kcal deficit approach; Meal replacements; Very-low-calorie diets; Low-glycaemic-index diets; Low-carbohydrate diets; Fad diets; Physical-activity treatments; How much activity is needed?; Intensity and type of activity; Behaviour modification

An increasingly wide range of patients of different age, ethnicity and social background often combined with other clinical conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or osteoporosis now find themselves battling against obesity and many health professionals become frustrated, feeling ill-equipped to handle each unique case with the one-size-fits-all approach offered by the ""eat less, exercise more"" mantra. Weight Management: A Practitioner's Guide explains how effective evidence-based programmes structured in a manner addressing the key components of diet and physical activity integ