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21st Century Communication [electronic resource].

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9781412950305Publication details: Thousand Oaks : SAGE Publications, 2009.ISBN:
  • 9781452265988
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: 21st Century Communication: A Reference HandbookDDC classification:
  • 302.2 302.20905
LOC classification:
  • P90 .A14 2009
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; About the Editors; Part I: The Discipline of Communication; 1 - Communication as An Idea and as An Ideal; 2 - Communication as A Field and as A Discipline; 3 - The Speech Tradition; 4 - The Journalism Tradition; Part II: Approaches to the Study of Communication; 5 - Philosophical Approaches to Communication; 6 - Rhetorical and Textual Approaches to Communication; 7 - Quantitative Approaches to Communication Research; 8 - Qualitative, Ethnographic, and Performative Approaches to Communication; 9 - Critical/Cultural Approaches to Communication
10 - Feminist Approaches to Communication11 - Queer Approaches to Communication; Part III: Key Processes of Communication; 12 - Message Construction and Editing; 13 - Cognition and Information Processing; 14 - Perspective Taking, Adaptation, and Coordination; 15 - Social Construction; 16 - Listening, Understanding, and Misunderstanding; 17 - Performance and Storytelling; 18 - Persuasion and Compliance Gaining; 19 - Identity as Constituted in Communication; Part IV: Forms and Types of Communication; 20 - Conversation, Dialogue, and Discourse; 21 - Interviewing; 22 - Public Speaking
23 - Deliberation, Debate, and Decision Making24 - Conflict Management and Mediation; 25 - Visual Rhetoric; 26 - Memorials and Other Forms of Collective Memory; Part V: Key Characteristics of Messages; 27 - The Interplay of Verbal and Nonverbal Cues; 28 - Rhetorical Style; 29 - Genre; 30 - Dramatic Elements in Messages; 31 - Rhetorical Exigency, Strategy, and Argumentation; 32 - Social Support; Part VI: Key Communication Relationships; 33 - Spouses and Other Intimate Partnerships; 34 - Children, Parents, and Grandparents; 35 - Friends; 36 - Dating and Romantic Partners
37 - Supervisors, Subordinates, and Coworkers38 - Social Groups, Workgroups, and Teams; 39 - Students and Teachers; 40 - Patients, Doctors, and Other Helping Relationships; Part VII: Factors Affecting Communication; 41 - Gender; 42 - Ethnicity; 43 - Sexual Orientation; 44 - Culture; 45 - Risk; 46 - Freedom of Expression; 47 - Globalization; Part VIII: Challenges and Opportunities for Communication; 48 - Ethical and Unethical Communication; 49 - Competent and Incompetent Communication; 50 - Unwanted Communication, Agression, and Abuse; 51 - Sexual Harassment; 52 - Deception; 53 - Bias
68 - Magazine and Feature Writing
Part IX: Media as Communication54 - Traditional and New Media; 55 - Media Portrayals and Representations; 56 - Media Uses and Gratifications; 57 - Agenda Setting and Framing; 58 - Cultivation and Media Exposure; 59 - Virtual Reality and Presence; 60 - Computer-Mediated Communication; 61 - Group Decision Support Systems; 62 - Media Literacy; Part X: Communication as a Profession; 63 - Professional Communication Practices; Part XI: Journalism; 64 - The Idea of Journalism; 65 - The Changing Nature of ""News""; 66 - Reporting, Story Development, and Editing; 67 - Investigative Journalism
Summary: The discipline of communication has grown in popularity from the time professors of journalism and speech decided, in the mid-1960s, that the term "communication" was an excellent general descriptor for the theory and research that each group aspired to create. Over time, the two groups grew closer and recognized significant overlap in their theoretical and research interests, but there were also differences in their traditions that kept them apart. While both groups agreed that communication is a practical discipline, journalism professors focused a great deal of their attention on the educ
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Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; Preface; About the Editors; Part I: The Discipline of Communication; 1 - Communication as An Idea and as An Ideal; 2 - Communication as A Field and as A Discipline; 3 - The Speech Tradition; 4 - The Journalism Tradition; Part II: Approaches to the Study of Communication; 5 - Philosophical Approaches to Communication; 6 - Rhetorical and Textual Approaches to Communication; 7 - Quantitative Approaches to Communication Research; 8 - Qualitative, Ethnographic, and Performative Approaches to Communication; 9 - Critical/Cultural Approaches to Communication

10 - Feminist Approaches to Communication11 - Queer Approaches to Communication; Part III: Key Processes of Communication; 12 - Message Construction and Editing; 13 - Cognition and Information Processing; 14 - Perspective Taking, Adaptation, and Coordination; 15 - Social Construction; 16 - Listening, Understanding, and Misunderstanding; 17 - Performance and Storytelling; 18 - Persuasion and Compliance Gaining; 19 - Identity as Constituted in Communication; Part IV: Forms and Types of Communication; 20 - Conversation, Dialogue, and Discourse; 21 - Interviewing; 22 - Public Speaking

23 - Deliberation, Debate, and Decision Making24 - Conflict Management and Mediation; 25 - Visual Rhetoric; 26 - Memorials and Other Forms of Collective Memory; Part V: Key Characteristics of Messages; 27 - The Interplay of Verbal and Nonverbal Cues; 28 - Rhetorical Style; 29 - Genre; 30 - Dramatic Elements in Messages; 31 - Rhetorical Exigency, Strategy, and Argumentation; 32 - Social Support; Part VI: Key Communication Relationships; 33 - Spouses and Other Intimate Partnerships; 34 - Children, Parents, and Grandparents; 35 - Friends; 36 - Dating and Romantic Partners

37 - Supervisors, Subordinates, and Coworkers38 - Social Groups, Workgroups, and Teams; 39 - Students and Teachers; 40 - Patients, Doctors, and Other Helping Relationships; Part VII: Factors Affecting Communication; 41 - Gender; 42 - Ethnicity; 43 - Sexual Orientation; 44 - Culture; 45 - Risk; 46 - Freedom of Expression; 47 - Globalization; Part VIII: Challenges and Opportunities for Communication; 48 - Ethical and Unethical Communication; 49 - Competent and Incompetent Communication; 50 - Unwanted Communication, Agression, and Abuse; 51 - Sexual Harassment; 52 - Deception; 53 - Bias

68 - Magazine and Feature Writing

Part IX: Media as Communication54 - Traditional and New Media; 55 - Media Portrayals and Representations; 56 - Media Uses and Gratifications; 57 - Agenda Setting and Framing; 58 - Cultivation and Media Exposure; 59 - Virtual Reality and Presence; 60 - Computer-Mediated Communication; 61 - Group Decision Support Systems; 62 - Media Literacy; Part X: Communication as a Profession; 63 - Professional Communication Practices; Part XI: Journalism; 64 - The Idea of Journalism; 65 - The Changing Nature of ""News""; 66 - Reporting, Story Development, and Editing; 67 - Investigative Journalism

The discipline of communication has grown in popularity from the time professors of journalism and speech decided, in the mid-1960s, that the term "communication" was an excellent general descriptor for the theory and research that each group aspired to create. Over time, the two groups grew closer and recognized significant overlap in their theoretical and research interests, but there were also differences in their traditions that kept them apart. While both groups agreed that communication is a practical discipline, journalism professors focused a great deal of their attention on the educ