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Human-Computer Interaction [electronic resource] : An Empirical Research Perspective

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780124058651Publication details: Burlington : Elsevier Science, 2012.ISBN:
  • 9780124071650
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Human-Computer Interaction : An Empirical Research PerspectiveDDC classification:
  • 006.3
LOC classification:
  • QA76.76.I58 .H384 2013
Online resources:
Contents:
Front Cover; Human-Computer Interaction; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; 1 Historical Context; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Vannevar Bush's "as we may think" (1945); 1.3 Ivan Sutherland's Sketchpad (1962); 1.4 Invention of the mouse (1963); 1.5 Xerox star (1981); 1.6 Birth of HCI (1983); 1.6.1 First ACM SIGCHI conference (1983); 1.6.2 The psychology of human-computer interaction (1983); 1.6.3 Launch of the Apple Macintosh (1984); 1.7 Growth of HCI and graphical user interfaces (GUIs); 1.8 Growth of HCI research; 1.9 Other readings; 1.10 Resources
3.1 Hard controls and soft controls3.2 Control-display relationships; 3.2.1 Spatial relationships; 3.2.2 CD gain and transfer function; 3.2.3 Latency; 3.2.4 Property sensed and order of control; 3.3 Natural versus learned relationships; 3.4 Mental models and metaphor; 3.5 Modes; 3.6 More about degrees of freedom; 3.7 Mobile context; 3.8 Interaction errors; Student Exercises; 4 Scientific Foundations; 4.1 What is research?; 4.1.1 Research must be published; 4.1.2 Citations, references, impact; 4.1.3 Research must be reproducible; 4.1.4 Research versus engineering versus design
4.2 What is empirical research?4.3 Research methods; 4.3.1 Observational method; 4.3.2 Experimental method; 4.3.3 Correlational method; 4.4 Observe and measure; 4.4.1 Observation; 4.4.2 Measurement scales; 4.4.3 Nominal; 4.4.4 Ordinal data; 4.4.5 Interval data; 4.4.6 Ratio data; 4.5 Research questions; 4.6 Internal validity and external validity; 4.7 Comparative evaluations; 4.8 Relationships: circumstantial and causal; 4.9 Research topics; 4.9.1 Ideas; 4.9.2 Finding a topic; 4.9.3 Tip #1: Think small!; 4.9.4 Tip #2: Replicate!; 4.9.5 Tip #3: Know the literature!
4.9.6 Tip #4: Think inside the box!Student Exercises; 5 Designing HCI Experiments; 5.1 What methodology?; 5.2 Ethics approval; 5.3 Experiment design; 5.4 Independent variables; 5.5 Dependent variables; 5.6 Other variables; 5.6.1 Control variables; 5.6.2 Random variables; 5.6.3 Confounding variables; 5.7 Task and procedure; 5.8 Participants; 5.9 Questionnaire design; 5.10 Within-subjects and between-subjects; 5.11 Order effects, counterbalancing, and latin squares; 5.12 Group effects and asymmetric skill transfer; 5.13 Longitudinal studies; 5.14 Running the experiment; Student Exercises
6 Hypothesis Testing
Student Exercises2 The Human Factor; 2.1 Time scale of human action; 2.2 Human factors; 2.3 Sensors; 2.3.1 Vision (Sight); 2.3.2 Hearing (Audition); 2.3.3 Touch (Tactition); 2.3.4 Smell and taste; 2.3.5 Other senses; 2.4 Responders; 2.4.1 Limbs; 2.4.2 Voice; 2.4.3 Eyes; 2.5 The brain; 2.5.1 Perception; 2.5.2 Cognition; 2.5.3 Memory; 2.6 Language; 2.6.1 Redundancy in language; 2.6.2 Entropy in language; 2.7 Human performance; 2.7.1 Reaction time; 2.7.2 Visual search; 2.7.3 Skilled behavior; 2.7.4 Attention; 2.7.5 Human error; Student Exercises; 3 Interaction Elements
Summary: Human-Computer Interaction: An Empirical Research Perspective is the definitive guide to empirical research in HCI. The book begins with foundational topics including an historical context, the human factor, interaction elements, and the fundamentals of science and research. From there, you'll progress to learning about the methods for conducting an experiment to evaluate a new computer interface or interaction technique. There are detailed discussions and how-to analyses on models of interaction, focusing on descriptive models and predictive models. Writing and publishing a research
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Front Cover; Human-Computer Interaction; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; 1 Historical Context; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Vannevar Bush's "as we may think" (1945); 1.3 Ivan Sutherland's Sketchpad (1962); 1.4 Invention of the mouse (1963); 1.5 Xerox star (1981); 1.6 Birth of HCI (1983); 1.6.1 First ACM SIGCHI conference (1983); 1.6.2 The psychology of human-computer interaction (1983); 1.6.3 Launch of the Apple Macintosh (1984); 1.7 Growth of HCI and graphical user interfaces (GUIs); 1.8 Growth of HCI research; 1.9 Other readings; 1.10 Resources

3.1 Hard controls and soft controls3.2 Control-display relationships; 3.2.1 Spatial relationships; 3.2.2 CD gain and transfer function; 3.2.3 Latency; 3.2.4 Property sensed and order of control; 3.3 Natural versus learned relationships; 3.4 Mental models and metaphor; 3.5 Modes; 3.6 More about degrees of freedom; 3.7 Mobile context; 3.8 Interaction errors; Student Exercises; 4 Scientific Foundations; 4.1 What is research?; 4.1.1 Research must be published; 4.1.2 Citations, references, impact; 4.1.3 Research must be reproducible; 4.1.4 Research versus engineering versus design

4.2 What is empirical research?4.3 Research methods; 4.3.1 Observational method; 4.3.2 Experimental method; 4.3.3 Correlational method; 4.4 Observe and measure; 4.4.1 Observation; 4.4.2 Measurement scales; 4.4.3 Nominal; 4.4.4 Ordinal data; 4.4.5 Interval data; 4.4.6 Ratio data; 4.5 Research questions; 4.6 Internal validity and external validity; 4.7 Comparative evaluations; 4.8 Relationships: circumstantial and causal; 4.9 Research topics; 4.9.1 Ideas; 4.9.2 Finding a topic; 4.9.3 Tip #1: Think small!; 4.9.4 Tip #2: Replicate!; 4.9.5 Tip #3: Know the literature!

4.9.6 Tip #4: Think inside the box!Student Exercises; 5 Designing HCI Experiments; 5.1 What methodology?; 5.2 Ethics approval; 5.3 Experiment design; 5.4 Independent variables; 5.5 Dependent variables; 5.6 Other variables; 5.6.1 Control variables; 5.6.2 Random variables; 5.6.3 Confounding variables; 5.7 Task and procedure; 5.8 Participants; 5.9 Questionnaire design; 5.10 Within-subjects and between-subjects; 5.11 Order effects, counterbalancing, and latin squares; 5.12 Group effects and asymmetric skill transfer; 5.13 Longitudinal studies; 5.14 Running the experiment; Student Exercises

6 Hypothesis Testing

Student Exercises2 The Human Factor; 2.1 Time scale of human action; 2.2 Human factors; 2.3 Sensors; 2.3.1 Vision (Sight); 2.3.2 Hearing (Audition); 2.3.3 Touch (Tactition); 2.3.4 Smell and taste; 2.3.5 Other senses; 2.4 Responders; 2.4.1 Limbs; 2.4.2 Voice; 2.4.3 Eyes; 2.5 The brain; 2.5.1 Perception; 2.5.2 Cognition; 2.5.3 Memory; 2.6 Language; 2.6.1 Redundancy in language; 2.6.2 Entropy in language; 2.7 Human performance; 2.7.1 Reaction time; 2.7.2 Visual search; 2.7.3 Skilled behavior; 2.7.4 Attention; 2.7.5 Human error; Student Exercises; 3 Interaction Elements

Human-Computer Interaction: An Empirical Research Perspective is the definitive guide to empirical research in HCI. The book begins with foundational topics including an historical context, the human factor, interaction elements, and the fundamentals of science and research. From there, you'll progress to learning about the methods for conducting an experiment to evaluate a new computer interface or interaction technique. There are detailed discussions and how-to analyses on models of interaction, focusing on descriptive models and predictive models. Writing and publishing a research