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Weimar Germany [electronic resource].

By: Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher number: 9780199280070Series: Short Oxford History of GermanyPublication details: Oxford : OUP Oxford, 2009.ISBN:
  • 9780191500480
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: Print version:: Weimar GermanyDDC classification:
  • 943.085
LOC classification:
  • DD237 .W444 2009
Online resources:
Contents:
Cover Page; Title Page; Copyright Page; The Short Oxford History of Germany; Contents; Glossary; List of contributors; Introduction; Anthony McElligott; The 'doomed' republic; Weimar and the limits of 'crisis years of classical modernity'; Weimar and the ambiguities of 'classical modernity'; Conclusion; 1 Political culture; Anthony McElligott; The republic as contingency; The republic between Volksstaat and plebiscitary state; Revolution and reaction; The Volksstaat; Towards the plebiscitary state; Plebiscitary dictatorship; 2 Foreign policy; Wolfgang Elz; The Versailles Treaty
Modern taste as hygienic obligationComplex ways of appropriation; The 'new feeling of life' in society; Transnational communication; Conclusion; 9 Weimar Jewry; Anthony D. Kauders; Who were the Jews?; The origins of Weimar Jewry; Liberalism ante mortem? Jewish politics; In a liberal key: religious-cultural debate; 10 High brow and low brow culture; Karl Christian Führer; The public promotion of art and culture; Art as leisure; Arts and the public; Further Reading; Chancellors of the Weimar Republic, 1919-1933; Chronology; Map; Index
The cities' 'new order''Reform born out of catastrophe'; 6 Women and the politics of gender; Kathleen Canning; Women, war, and transformations of gender, 1914-1918; Women and gender in the founding of the republic; Gender and the party-political arena; Labour, consumption, and sexual politics in the era of rationalization; Sexual crisis and the crisis of the republic; 7 The Weimar welfare system; Young-Sun Hong; Introduction; Historiographical parameters; Unemployment relief; Veterans, dependants, survivors, and the other new poor; The National Social Welfare Law
The Stresemann eraGerman-French rapprochement; The end of rapprochement; Aggressive revisionism; 3 The Reichswehr and the Weimar Republic; William Mulligan; The army and the new regime, 1918-1920; Seeckt's prescription, 1920-1923; The state and the militarization of society, 1923-1930; The consequences of Weimar's military vision; Conclusion; 4 The Weimar economy; Harold James; Economic performance; Economic policy; Economic constraints; Conclusion; 5 The 'urban republic'; John Bingham; A republic of cities; The problem of urban modernity; Reform pressures; The Städtetag
Welfare, corporatism, and the Weimar stateSocial hygiene, social discipline, and the question of continuities between Weimar welfare and Nazi racism; Youth welfare; The law that wasn't: correctional custody and the ambiguities of social citizenship; Conclusion; 8 'Neues Wohnen': Housing and reform; Adelheid von Saldern; Introduction; Visible evidence of social reform; The concepts of the reformers and the profiles of the housing estates; The obligation to the modern lifestyle; The nuclear family and the well-maintained neighbourhood; The traditional gender order in modern guise
Summary: The Weimar Republic was born out of Germany's defeat in the First World War and ended with the coming to power of Hitler and his Nazi Party in 1933. In many ways, it is a wonder that Weimar lasted as long as it did. Besieged from the outset by hostile forces, the young republic was threatened by revolution from the left and coups d'états from the right. Plagued early on by a wave of high-profile political assassinations and a period of devastating hyper-inflation, its lateryears were dominated by the onset of the Great Depression. And yet, for a period from the mid-1920s it looked as if the We
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Electronic Resource Electronic Resource UH Online Library Ebooks Not for loan
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover Page; Title Page; Copyright Page; The Short Oxford History of Germany; Contents; Glossary; List of contributors; Introduction; Anthony McElligott; The 'doomed' republic; Weimar and the limits of 'crisis years of classical modernity'; Weimar and the ambiguities of 'classical modernity'; Conclusion; 1 Political culture; Anthony McElligott; The republic as contingency; The republic between Volksstaat and plebiscitary state; Revolution and reaction; The Volksstaat; Towards the plebiscitary state; Plebiscitary dictatorship; 2 Foreign policy; Wolfgang Elz; The Versailles Treaty

Modern taste as hygienic obligationComplex ways of appropriation; The 'new feeling of life' in society; Transnational communication; Conclusion; 9 Weimar Jewry; Anthony D. Kauders; Who were the Jews?; The origins of Weimar Jewry; Liberalism ante mortem? Jewish politics; In a liberal key: religious-cultural debate; 10 High brow and low brow culture; Karl Christian Führer; The public promotion of art and culture; Art as leisure; Arts and the public; Further Reading; Chancellors of the Weimar Republic, 1919-1933; Chronology; Map; Index

The cities' 'new order''Reform born out of catastrophe'; 6 Women and the politics of gender; Kathleen Canning; Women, war, and transformations of gender, 1914-1918; Women and gender in the founding of the republic; Gender and the party-political arena; Labour, consumption, and sexual politics in the era of rationalization; Sexual crisis and the crisis of the republic; 7 The Weimar welfare system; Young-Sun Hong; Introduction; Historiographical parameters; Unemployment relief; Veterans, dependants, survivors, and the other new poor; The National Social Welfare Law

The Stresemann eraGerman-French rapprochement; The end of rapprochement; Aggressive revisionism; 3 The Reichswehr and the Weimar Republic; William Mulligan; The army and the new regime, 1918-1920; Seeckt's prescription, 1920-1923; The state and the militarization of society, 1923-1930; The consequences of Weimar's military vision; Conclusion; 4 The Weimar economy; Harold James; Economic performance; Economic policy; Economic constraints; Conclusion; 5 The 'urban republic'; John Bingham; A republic of cities; The problem of urban modernity; Reform pressures; The Städtetag

Welfare, corporatism, and the Weimar stateSocial hygiene, social discipline, and the question of continuities between Weimar welfare and Nazi racism; Youth welfare; The law that wasn't: correctional custody and the ambiguities of social citizenship; Conclusion; 8 'Neues Wohnen': Housing and reform; Adelheid von Saldern; Introduction; Visible evidence of social reform; The concepts of the reformers and the profiles of the housing estates; The obligation to the modern lifestyle; The nuclear family and the well-maintained neighbourhood; The traditional gender order in modern guise

The Weimar Republic was born out of Germany's defeat in the First World War and ended with the coming to power of Hitler and his Nazi Party in 1933. In many ways, it is a wonder that Weimar lasted as long as it did. Besieged from the outset by hostile forces, the young republic was threatened by revolution from the left and coups d'états from the right. Plagued early on by a wave of high-profile political assassinations and a period of devastating hyper-inflation, its lateryears were dominated by the onset of the Great Depression. And yet, for a period from the mid-1920s it looked as if the We