Employee representation and trade unions. [videorecording]

Contributor(s): Material type: FilmFilmPublication details: TV Choice Productions, 2012.Description: 1 DVD (23 min.)Subject(s): Summary: How might employees have a say in the organisation for which they work? How important is the role of trade unions? Employees make their voices heard in a company in many different ways - from employee co-operatives to works councils. But, generally, in most industries, trade unions play a key role. Historically trade unions have campaigned for their members' rights. But in the 1980s union power was severely curtailed after a clash with the government. What do unions do for their members today? What are the laws they have to work within? How might a union win statutory recognition in a company? And what's the role of ACAS? Blakeway boss Stephen Maynard plans to close one of his factories, throwing many employees out of work. Maynard isn't keen on unions and is horrified when a union gets in the way of his plans. Under the law, if the union gets enough people to vote for unionisation, they can win statutory recognition. Maynard is forced to negotiate. Can he still push through the factory closure? Will the union use industrial action to save people's jobs?
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 331.880941 EMP (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 5001650495
Total holds: 0

How might employees have a say in the organisation for which they work? How important is the role of trade unions? Employees make their voices heard in a company in many different ways - from employee co-operatives to works councils. But, generally, in most industries, trade unions play a key role. Historically trade unions have campaigned for their members' rights. But in the 1980s union power was severely curtailed after a clash with the government. What do unions do for their members today? What are the laws they have to work within? How might a union win statutory recognition in a company? And what's the role of ACAS? Blakeway boss Stephen Maynard plans to close one of his factories, throwing many employees out of work. Maynard isn't keen on unions and is horrified when a union gets in the way of his plans. Under the law, if the union gets enough people to vote for unionisation, they can win statutory recognition. Maynard is forced to negotiate. Can he still push through the factory closure? Will the union use industrial action to save people's jobs?