Syndetics cover image
Image from Syndetics

James VI and I / Roger Lockyer.

By: Lockyer, RogerMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Profiles in power | Publication details: London : Addison Wesley Longman, 1998. ISBN: 0582279623; 0582279615Subject(s): James I, King of England | Great Britain -- History -- James I, 1603-1625 | Great Britain -- Kings and rulers -- Biography | Scotland -- History -- James VI, 1567-1625 | Scotland -- Kings and rulers -- BiographyDDC classification: 941.061092 LOC classification: DA391Summary: In 1567 James Stuart, the infant son of Mary Queen of Scots, became king of Scotland (as James VI) on his mother's forced abdication; almost thirty-six years later, on 24th March 1603, he also inherited the English throne (this time as James I) on the death of Elizabeth. His subsequent joint reign united the two crowns, and established the Stuart - dynasty in England - and with it, according to many, much of the disastrous agenda that would lead to the deposition of his ill-starred son, Charles I. Roger Lockyer's new study (based throughout on primary as well as secondary sources) is the first major reappraisal of James in recent years to take new historiography fully into account. It throws fresh light on the major themes of early seventeenth-century British history, including religion, royal relations with political institutions, and the divine right of kings. Above all, while fully acknowledging James's limitations, it rescues the king from undeserved contempt.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre
Main Shelves
941.061092 LOC (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4404499676
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Chronology: p218-221. - Includes indexd index.

In 1567 James Stuart, the infant son of Mary Queen of Scots, became king of Scotland (as James VI) on his mother's forced abdication; almost thirty-six years later, on 24th March 1603, he also inherited the English throne (this time as James I) on the death of Elizabeth. His subsequent joint reign united the two crowns, and established the Stuart - dynasty in England - and with it, according to many, much of the disastrous agenda that would lead to the deposition of his ill-starred son, Charles I. Roger Lockyer's new study (based throughout on primary as well as secondary sources) is the first major reappraisal of James in recent years to take new historiography fully into account. It throws fresh light on the major themes of early seventeenth-century British history, including religion, royal relations with political institutions, and the divine right of kings. Above all, while fully acknowledging James's limitations, it rescues the king from undeserved contempt.

Powered by Koha