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Moral reasons / Jonathan Dancy.

By: Material type: TextTextPublication details: Oxford [England] ; Cambridge, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers, 1993.ISBN:
  • 0631177752
  • 0631187928
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 170 20
Contents:
1. Internalism and Cognitivism. 1. Internalism and externalism. 2. Problems for cognitivist internalism. 3. Forms of cognitivist internalism. 4. Motivated desire theory. 5. Pure cognitivism -- 2. The Pure Theory and Its Rivals. 1. Pure and hybrid theories. 2. Intrinsically motivating states. 3. Directions of fit. 4. Metaphysical underpinnings. 5. Motivating beliefs v. facts as reasons. 6. Non-purposive action -- 3. In Defence of Purity. 1. Further problems. 2. Moral and non-moral reasons. 3. Silencing and virtue. 4. Silencing and weakness of will. 5. Particularism and the pure theory -- 4. Why Particularism? 1. Holism in the theory of reasons. 2. Approaches to moral judgement. 3. Switching arguments. 4. Moral principles -- 5. Against Generalism (1). 1. Resultance. 2. Supervenience. 3. Universalizability. 4. Subsumptive rationality. 5. Subsumption and non-cognitivism. 6. A different argument. 7. Universalizability as a weapon -- 6. Against Generalism (2). 1. The theory of prima facie duties. 2. The notion of a prima facie duty. 3. The propensity theory. 4. The need for general moral truths -- 7. Conflict, Dilemma, Regret. 1. Defeated reasons. 2. Salience and shape. 3. Defeated reasons again. 4. The rationality of regret. 5. Strong incommensurability -- 8. Supererogation. 1. Shapes and the supererogatory. 2. Deontic and evaluative properties. 3. Three accounts of supererogation. 4. The cost to the agent. 5. Deontic and evaluative properties again -- 9. Objectivity. 1. Nagel's two viewpoints. 2. Two conceptions of objectivity. 3. Moral reasons and objectivity. 4. Degrees of objectivity. 5. The analogy with colour. 6. Are values and colours both dispositions? 7. Shapes and dispositions -- 10. Towards Agent - Relativity. 1. Non-consequentialist reasons. 2. Scheffler's liberation strategy. 3. Against the independence thesis. 4. Consequentialism and consequences. 5. The pro tanto reason to promote the good. 6. Forms of agent-relativity -- 11. Agent-Relativity - The Very Idea. 1. Motivation. 2. Kagan. 3. Nagel. 4. Sen. 5. Parfit and common aims. 6. Conclusions -- 12. Discounting the Cost. 1. An analogy. 2. Options and discounts. 3. Constraints and moral cost. 4. Begging the question. 5. Absolute and threshold constraints. 6. Particularism and the agent-relative. 7. Is agent-relative morality demanding enough? -- 13. Consequentialism and the Agent-Relative. 1. Is consequentialism self-effacing? 2. Ends, aims and motives. 3. Acts and agents. 4. A self-defeating theory? 5. Blameless wrongdoing. 6. Two criteria. 7. The act/agent distinction. 8. Conclusion. Appendix II Hare's later views -- Appendix III Nagel on incommensurability.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Internalism and Cognitivism. 1. Internalism and externalism. 2. Problems for cognitivist internalism. 3. Forms of cognitivist internalism. 4. Motivated desire theory. 5. Pure cognitivism -- 2. The Pure Theory and Its Rivals. 1. Pure and hybrid theories. 2. Intrinsically motivating states. 3. Directions of fit. 4. Metaphysical underpinnings. 5. Motivating beliefs v. facts as reasons. 6. Non-purposive action -- 3. In Defence of Purity. 1. Further problems. 2. Moral and non-moral reasons. 3. Silencing and virtue. 4. Silencing and weakness of will. 5. Particularism and the pure theory -- 4. Why Particularism? 1. Holism in the theory of reasons. 2. Approaches to moral judgement. 3. Switching arguments. 4. Moral principles -- 5. Against Generalism (1). 1. Resultance. 2. Supervenience. 3. Universalizability. 4. Subsumptive rationality. 5. Subsumption and non-cognitivism. 6. A different argument. 7. Universalizability as a weapon -- 6. Against Generalism (2). 1. The theory of prima facie duties. 2. The notion of a prima facie duty. 3. The propensity theory. 4. The need for general moral truths -- 7. Conflict, Dilemma, Regret. 1. Defeated reasons. 2. Salience and shape. 3. Defeated reasons again. 4. The rationality of regret. 5. Strong incommensurability -- 8. Supererogation. 1. Shapes and the supererogatory. 2. Deontic and evaluative properties. 3. Three accounts of supererogation. 4. The cost to the agent. 5. Deontic and evaluative properties again -- 9. Objectivity. 1. Nagel's two viewpoints. 2. Two conceptions of objectivity. 3. Moral reasons and objectivity. 4. Degrees of objectivity. 5. The analogy with colour. 6. Are values and colours both dispositions? 7. Shapes and dispositions -- 10. Towards Agent - Relativity. 1. Non-consequentialist reasons. 2. Scheffler's liberation strategy. 3. Against the independence thesis. 4. Consequentialism and consequences. 5. The pro tanto reason to promote the good. 6. Forms of agent-relativity -- 11. Agent-Relativity - The Very Idea. 1. Motivation. 2. Kagan. 3. Nagel. 4. Sen. 5. Parfit and common aims. 6. Conclusions -- 12. Discounting the Cost. 1. An analogy. 2. Options and discounts. 3. Constraints and moral cost. 4. Begging the question. 5. Absolute and threshold constraints. 6. Particularism and the agent-relative. 7. Is agent-relative morality demanding enough? -- 13. Consequentialism and the Agent-Relative. 1. Is consequentialism self-effacing? 2. Ends, aims and motives. 3. Acts and agents. 4. A self-defeating theory? 5. Blameless wrongdoing. 6. Two criteria. 7. The act/agent distinction. 8. Conclusion. Appendix II Hare's later views -- Appendix III Nagel on incommensurability.