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The problem of nature : environment, culture and European expansion / David Arnold.

By: Material type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. : Blackwell, 1996.ISBN:
  • 0631177329
  • 063119021X
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 304.209 20
LOC classification:
  • GE50
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. The Place of Nature -- 3. Reappraising Nature -- 4. Environment as Catastrophe -- 5. Crossing Biological Boundaries -- 6. The Ecological Frontier -- 7. The Environmental Revolution -- 8. Inventing Tropicality -- 9. Colonizing Nature.
Summary: This book considers how nature - in both its biological and environmental manifestations - has been invoked as a dynamic force in human history. It shows how historians, philosophers, geographers, anthropologists and scientists have used ideas of nature to explain the evolution of cultures, to understand cultural difference, and to justify or condemn colonization, slavery and racial superiority. It examines the central part that ideas of environmental and biological determinism have played in theory, and describes how these ideas have served in different ways at different times as instruments of authority, identity and defiance. The book shows how powerful and problematic the invocation of nature can be.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 304.209 ARN (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403875466
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 304.209 ARN (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403875475
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Introduction -- 2. The Place of Nature -- 3. Reappraising Nature -- 4. Environment as Catastrophe -- 5. Crossing Biological Boundaries -- 6. The Ecological Frontier -- 7. The Environmental Revolution -- 8. Inventing Tropicality -- 9. Colonizing Nature.

This book considers how nature - in both its biological and environmental manifestations - has been invoked as a dynamic force in human history. It shows how historians, philosophers, geographers, anthropologists and scientists have used ideas of nature to explain the evolution of cultures, to understand cultural difference, and to justify or condemn colonization, slavery and racial superiority. It examines the central part that ideas of environmental and biological determinism have played in theory, and describes how these ideas have served in different ways at different times as instruments of authority, identity and defiance. The book shows how powerful and problematic the invocation of nature can be.