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The Labour Party since 1945 : old Labour, new Labour.

By: Material type: TextTextSeries: Making contemporary BritainPublication details: Oxford : Blackwell, 1996.ISBN:
  • 0631196544
  • 0631196552
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 324.24107 20
Contents:
1. The Early Years, 1900-1945 -- 2. The Triumph of Labour, 1945-1951 -- 3. The Rise of Keynesian Social Democracy -- 4. Keynesian Social Democracy in Power, 1964-1970 -- 5. Keynesian Social Democracy in Retreat, 1970-1974 -- 6. The Unravelling of Keynesian Social Democracy, 1974-1979 -- 7. Time of Troubles, 1979-1987 -- 8. The Abandonment of Keynesian Social Democracy, 1987-1995 -- 9. Conclusion: Labour Old and New.
Summary: This book provides a critical overview of the changing Labour Party in post-war Britain. Adopting a thematic approach within a structured, chronological framework, the book revolves around one central question: what has the Party been about and what specific objectives has it striven to realize? The author examines the so-called transformation from 'Old Labour' to 'New Labour', and not only identifies the key stages in its evolution, but highlights, too, the major determinants of the change. Eric Shaw focuses on the key areas of debate which illustrate Labour's unfolding aims and its responses to a range of pressures and constraints, namely economic policy, industrial policy, industrial relations and employment policy, and the nature of the welfare state. It is through discussion of these issues that he investigates the tension between traditionalism and modernization in the party and identifies the most significant influences behind change: Labour's organizational structure, rules and policy-making procedures; its distribution of power; its ethos and conventions; its electoral performance and the evolving social, economic and political environment of post-war Britain. Setting the dynamics of the Party within the context of dominant theories of party political change, the book also provides a significant contribution to debates on the nature of post-war British politics, useful for all students of contemporary history and political science.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 329.941 SHA (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403607180
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references.

1. The Early Years, 1900-1945 -- 2. The Triumph of Labour, 1945-1951 -- 3. The Rise of Keynesian Social Democracy -- 4. Keynesian Social Democracy in Power, 1964-1970 -- 5. Keynesian Social Democracy in Retreat, 1970-1974 -- 6. The Unravelling of Keynesian Social Democracy, 1974-1979 -- 7. Time of Troubles, 1979-1987 -- 8. The Abandonment of Keynesian Social Democracy, 1987-1995 -- 9. Conclusion: Labour Old and New.

This book provides a critical overview of the changing Labour Party in post-war Britain. Adopting a thematic approach within a structured, chronological framework, the book revolves around one central question: what has the Party been about and what specific objectives has it striven to realize? The author examines the so-called transformation from 'Old Labour' to 'New Labour', and not only identifies the key stages in its evolution, but highlights, too, the major determinants of the change. Eric Shaw focuses on the key areas of debate which illustrate Labour's unfolding aims and its responses to a range of pressures and constraints, namely economic policy, industrial policy, industrial relations and employment policy, and the nature of the welfare state. It is through discussion of these issues that he investigates the tension between traditionalism and modernization in the party and identifies the most significant influences behind change: Labour's organizational structure, rules and policy-making procedures; its distribution of power; its ethos and conventions; its electoral performance and the evolving social, economic and political environment of post-war Britain. Setting the dynamics of the Party within the context of dominant theories of party political change, the book also provides a significant contribution to debates on the nature of post-war British politics, useful for all students of contemporary history and political science.