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Ludwig Wittgenstein : Cambridge letters : correspondence with Russell, Keynes, Moore, Ramsey, and Sraffa / edited by Brian McGuinness and Georg Henrik von Wright.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublication details: Oxford : Blackwell, 1995.ISBN:
  • 0631190155
  • 0631207589
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 192 21
Review: "The discovery, in various quarters, of hitherto unknown letters exchanged between Wittgenstein and the chief of his Cambridge friends provides the basis for this new and profoundly revealing collection." "Wittgenstein appears in turn shy and affectionate, fierce and censorious, happy to collaborate and sure of his own judgement. Four quarrels and four reconciliations are documented. Wittgenstein's struggles to publish his Tractatus may be followed, as well as his retreat from the world, his being wooed back to philosophy by Keynes and Ramsey, and his plans to leave philosophy. The accompanying editorial notes are based on archival material not previously explored." "Taken together, the correspondence provides an intriguing insight into Wittgenstein's life and thought, and will be essential reading for students and scholars."--BOOK JACKET.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 192 WIT (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4404294526
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 192 WIT (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4405055234
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"Some material in this book appeared previously in Letters to Russell, Keynes and Moore (Blackwell Publishers 1974)" - t.p. verso

"The discovery, in various quarters, of hitherto unknown letters exchanged between Wittgenstein and the chief of his Cambridge friends provides the basis for this new and profoundly revealing collection." "Wittgenstein appears in turn shy and affectionate, fierce and censorious, happy to collaborate and sure of his own judgement. Four quarrels and four reconciliations are documented. Wittgenstein's struggles to publish his Tractatus may be followed, as well as his retreat from the world, his being wooed back to philosophy by Keynes and Ramsey, and his plans to leave philosophy. The accompanying editorial notes are based on archival material not previously explored." "Taken together, the correspondence provides an intriguing insight into Wittgenstein's life and thought, and will be essential reading for students and scholars."--BOOK JACKET.