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The ambiguity of play.

By: Material type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Harvard University Press, 1997.ISBN:
  • 0674017331
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 155 21
Contents:
1. Play and Ambiguity -- 2. Rhetorics of Animal Progress -- 3. Rhetorics of Child Play -- 4. Rhetorics of Fate -- 5. Rhetorics of Power -- 6. Rhetorics of Identity -- 7. Child Power and Identity -- 8. Rhetorics of the Imaginary -- 9. Child Phantasmagoria -- 10. Rhetorics of Self -- 11. Rhetorics of Frivolity -- 12. Conclusion.
Summary: Sutton-Smith focuses on play theories rooted in seven distinct "rhetorics" - the ancient discourses of fate, power, communal identity, and frivolity and the modern discourses of progress, the imaginary, and the self. In a sweeping analysis that moves from the question of play in child development to the implications of play for the Western work ethic, he explores the values, historical sources, and interests that have dictated the terms and forms of play put forth in each discourse's "objective" theory.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 155 SUT (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403938673
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

1. Play and Ambiguity -- 2. Rhetorics of Animal Progress -- 3. Rhetorics of Child Play -- 4. Rhetorics of Fate -- 5. Rhetorics of Power -- 6. Rhetorics of Identity -- 7. Child Power and Identity -- 8. Rhetorics of the Imaginary -- 9. Child Phantasmagoria -- 10. Rhetorics of Self -- 11. Rhetorics of Frivolity -- 12. Conclusion.

Sutton-Smith focuses on play theories rooted in seven distinct "rhetorics" - the ancient discourses of fate, power, communal identity, and frivolity and the modern discourses of progress, the imaginary, and the self. In a sweeping analysis that moves from the question of play in child development to the implications of play for the Western work ethic, he explores the values, historical sources, and interests that have dictated the terms and forms of play put forth in each discourse's "objective" theory.