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Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany.

By: Material type: TextTextPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Harvard University Press, 1992.ISBN:
  • 0674131770
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 323.60944 20
Contents:
Introduction: Traditions of Nationhood in France and Germany -- I. The Institution of Citizenship. 1. Citizenship as Social Closure. 2. The French Revolution and the Invention of National Citizenship. 3. State, State-System, and Citizenship in Germany -- II. Defining the Citizenry: The Bounds of Belonging. 4. Citizenship and Naturalization in France and Germany. 5. Migrants into Citizens: The Crystallization of Jus Soli in Late-Nineteenth-Century France. 6. The Citizenry as Community of Descent: The Nationalization of Citizenship in Wilhelmine Germany. 7. "Etre Francais, Cela se Merite": Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in France in the 1980s. 8. Continuities in the German Politics of Citizenship.
Summary: The state, wrote Aristotle, "is a compound made up of citizens; and this compels us to consider who should properly be called a citizen and what a citizen really is." These are the questions, with their broad implications for the modern nation-state, that Rogers Brubaker addresses here. In a time when the flow of information, capital, and immigration has blurred the definition of the state, Brubaker's sustained analysis of the origins and vicissitudes of citizenship in France and Germany reveals much about civic boundaries in the modern world. The difference between French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for millions of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, decisive. Brubaker explores this difference - between the territorial basis of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - and shows how it translates into rights and restrictions for millions of would-be French and German citizens. Why French citizenship is territorially inclusive, and German citizenship ethnically exclusive, becomes clear in Brubaker's historical account of distinctive French and German paths to nation-statehood. Two fundamental legal principles of national citizenship emerge from this analysis, leading Brubaker to broad and original observations on the constitution of the modern state. We live in a world bounded and defined by the legal institution of citizenship. The plight of immigrants moving across Western Europe has made this a particularly salient point, one frequently missed but finally brought into sharp focus here. Linking law, state, economy, and culture across two countries and centuries, this book offers a powerful explanation of forces that shape the modern world and delineate its future.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 323.60944 BRU (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 440145031X
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-265) and index.

Introduction: Traditions of Nationhood in France and Germany -- I. The Institution of Citizenship. 1. Citizenship as Social Closure. 2. The French Revolution and the Invention of National Citizenship. 3. State, State-System, and Citizenship in Germany -- II. Defining the Citizenry: The Bounds of Belonging. 4. Citizenship and Naturalization in France and Germany. 5. Migrants into Citizens: The Crystallization of Jus Soli in Late-Nineteenth-Century France. 6. The Citizenry as Community of Descent: The Nationalization of Citizenship in Wilhelmine Germany. 7. "Etre Francais, Cela se Merite": Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in France in the 1980s. 8. Continuities in the German Politics of Citizenship.

The state, wrote Aristotle, "is a compound made up of citizens; and this compels us to consider who should properly be called a citizen and what a citizen really is." These are the questions, with their broad implications for the modern nation-state, that Rogers Brubaker addresses here. In a time when the flow of information, capital, and immigration has blurred the definition of the state, Brubaker's sustained analysis of the origins and vicissitudes of citizenship in France and Germany reveals much about civic boundaries in the modern world. The difference between French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for millions of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, decisive. Brubaker explores this difference - between the territorial basis of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - and shows how it translates into rights and restrictions for millions of would-be French and German citizens. Why French citizenship is territorially inclusive, and German citizenship ethnically exclusive, becomes clear in Brubaker's historical account of distinctive French and German paths to nation-statehood. Two fundamental legal principles of national citizenship emerge from this analysis, leading Brubaker to broad and original observations on the constitution of the modern state. We live in a world bounded and defined by the legal institution of citizenship. The plight of immigrants moving across Western Europe has made this a particularly salient point, one frequently missed but finally brought into sharp focus here. Linking law, state, economy, and culture across two countries and centuries, this book offers a powerful explanation of forces that shape the modern world and delineate its future.