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Rural scenes and national representation : Britain, 1815-1850 / Elizabeth K. Helsinger.

By: Material type: TextTextSeries: Literature in history (Princeton, N.J.) | Studies in Italian culture--Literature in historyPublication details: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, 1997.ISBN:
  • 0691021465
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 820.9/321734 20
LOC classification:
  • PR468.R87 H45 1997
Contents:
Introduction: Land and the Nation -- Ch. 1. Constable: The Making of a National Painter -- Ch. 2. Out of the Heart of the Country: Tennyson's English Idyls -- Ch. 3. Cobbett's Radical Husbandry -- Ch. 4. Clare and the Place of the Peasant Poet -- Ch. 5. Turner's England and Wales -- Ch. 6. Bronte's Ghosts -- Ch. 7. Eliot's Risky History.
Summary: Elizabeth Helsinger's iconoclastic book explores the peculiar power of rural England to stand for conflicting ideas of Britain. Despite their nostalgic appeal, Constable's or Tennyson's rural scenes recorded the severe social and economic disturbances of the turbulent years after Waterloo. Artists and writers like Cobbett, Clare, Turner, Emily Bronte, and George Eliot competed to claim the English countryside as ideological ground. No image of rural life produced consensus over the great questions: who should constitute the nation, and how should they be represented? Helsinger ponders how some images of rural life and land come to serve as national metaphors while others challenge their constructions of Englishness at the heart of the British Empire.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 803.042 HEL (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403735373
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Land and the Nation -- Ch. 1. Constable: The Making of a National Painter -- Ch. 2. Out of the Heart of the Country: Tennyson's English Idyls -- Ch. 3. Cobbett's Radical Husbandry -- Ch. 4. Clare and the Place of the Peasant Poet -- Ch. 5. Turner's England and Wales -- Ch. 6. Bronte's Ghosts -- Ch. 7. Eliot's Risky History.

Elizabeth Helsinger's iconoclastic book explores the peculiar power of rural England to stand for conflicting ideas of Britain. Despite their nostalgic appeal, Constable's or Tennyson's rural scenes recorded the severe social and economic disturbances of the turbulent years after Waterloo. Artists and writers like Cobbett, Clare, Turner, Emily Bronte, and George Eliot competed to claim the English countryside as ideological ground. No image of rural life produced consensus over the great questions: who should constitute the nation, and how should they be represented? Helsinger ponders how some images of rural life and land come to serve as national metaphors while others challenge their constructions of Englishness at the heart of the British Empire.