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Reconstructing the Black past : Blacks in Britain, 1780-1830 / Norma Myers.

By: Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in slave and post-slave societies and culturesPublication details: London : Frank Cass, 1996.ISBN:
  • 0714645761
  • 0714642258
  • 0714645753
  • 0714641308
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 941.00496 20
Contents:
Emancipation and Its Consequences / Karen Fog Olwig -- Post-Emancipation Historiography of the Leeward Islands / B. W. Higman -- 'They Couldn't Mash Ants': The Decline of the White and Non-White Elites in Antigua, 1834-1900 / Susan Lowes -- From Labour to Peasantry in Montserrat after the End of Slavery / Riva Berleant-Schiller -- Land, Kinship and Community in the Post-Emancipation Caribbean: A Regional View of the Leewards / Jean Besson -- Cultural Complexity after Freedom: Nevis and Beyond / Karen Fog Olwig -- Post-Emancipation Resistance in the Caribbean: An Overview / Gad Heuman -- 'Our Side': Caribbean Immigrant Labourers and the Transition to Free Labour on St. Croix, 1849-79 / George F. Tyson -- Island Systems and the Paradox of Freedom: Migration in the Post-Emancipation Leeward Islands / Elizabeth M. Thomas-Hope -- The Wayward Leewards / David Lowenthal.
Summary: Historical research on the Caribbean has tended to concentrate on the slave era. The long post-emancipation period, when local societies adjusted to the social and economic conditions of a free-labour force and the emancipated attempted to create a new life of their own, has not been the subject of such extensive and rigorous examination. Small Islands, Large Questions seeks to fill this gap in Caribbean research and takes as its focus the English-speaking Leeward Islands, whose small size makes them especially well suited to case studies of the economic, social and cultural processes which link the pre-emancipation and the contemporary Caribbean. Moreover, the regional variation displayed by the individual islands makes them a good starting point for comparative analysis.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 941.00496 MYE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 440447252X
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 941.00496 MYE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4404472539
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Bibliography: p148-154. - Includes index.

Emancipation and Its Consequences / Karen Fog Olwig -- Post-Emancipation Historiography of the Leeward Islands / B. W. Higman -- 'They Couldn't Mash Ants': The Decline of the White and Non-White Elites in Antigua, 1834-1900 / Susan Lowes -- From Labour to Peasantry in Montserrat after the End of Slavery / Riva Berleant-Schiller -- Land, Kinship and Community in the Post-Emancipation Caribbean: A Regional View of the Leewards / Jean Besson -- Cultural Complexity after Freedom: Nevis and Beyond / Karen Fog Olwig -- Post-Emancipation Resistance in the Caribbean: An Overview / Gad Heuman -- 'Our Side': Caribbean Immigrant Labourers and the Transition to Free Labour on St. Croix, 1849-79 / George F. Tyson -- Island Systems and the Paradox of Freedom: Migration in the Post-Emancipation Leeward Islands / Elizabeth M. Thomas-Hope -- The Wayward Leewards / David Lowenthal.

Historical research on the Caribbean has tended to concentrate on the slave era. The long post-emancipation period, when local societies adjusted to the social and economic conditions of a free-labour force and the emancipated attempted to create a new life of their own, has not been the subject of such extensive and rigorous examination. Small Islands, Large Questions seeks to fill this gap in Caribbean research and takes as its focus the English-speaking Leeward Islands, whose small size makes them especially well suited to case studies of the economic, social and cultural processes which link the pre-emancipation and the contemporary Caribbean. Moreover, the regional variation displayed by the individual islands makes them a good starting point for comparative analysis.