Syndetics cover image
Image from Syndetics

Socialism and the common good : new Fabian essays / edited by Preston King.

Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublication details: London : Frank Cass, 1996.ISBN:
  • 0714646555
  • 071464255X
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 335.14 20
Contents:
1. Socialism and the common good / Anthony Arblaster -- 2. Socialism and common ownership: an historical perspective / Leslie Macfarlane -- 3. Labour: a choice of constituency / Preston King -- 4. Does society exist? The case for socialism / Brian Barry -- 5. Is collectivism essential? / David Winter -- 6. Citizenship, rights and socialism / Raymond Plant -- 7. Friends, Romans and consumers / Martin Hollis -- 8. The individualist premise and political community / Iain Hampsher-Monk -- 9. Incentives, inequality and community / G. A. Cohen -- 10. Citizenship and political obligation / Bhiku Parekh -- 11. Transnational justice: permeable boundaries and multiple identities / Onora O'Neill.
Summary: Socialism and the Common Good brings together a set of writings by some of the leading social and political thinkers at work in Britain today. Its object is to place before the public some seminal discussions of a central theme which is both theoretical and practical, namely the role of the state in achieving social justice in modern market systems from a socialist perspective. These essays touch many subjects, such as state ownership, collectivism, communitarianism, individualism, equality, citizenship, and national identity. Is state ownership essential to the common good? Is it only one among many possible means of securing social justice? Is communitarianism a threat to civil liberty? Is it, by contrast, a necessary condition for efficacy and fairness? The authors of these essays, all members of the Socialist Philosophy Group of the Fabian Society, follow no single line and approach these problems in diverse ways. The contributors, however, prove remarkably uniform in their rejection of the cult of choice and of rational egoism and in their promotion of a more robust and inclusive notion of community and of social responsibility.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan de Havilland Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 335 SOC (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403620795
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Includes index.

1. Socialism and the common good / Anthony Arblaster -- 2. Socialism and common ownership: an historical perspective / Leslie Macfarlane -- 3. Labour: a choice of constituency / Preston King -- 4. Does society exist? The case for socialism / Brian Barry -- 5. Is collectivism essential? / David Winter -- 6. Citizenship, rights and socialism / Raymond Plant -- 7. Friends, Romans and consumers / Martin Hollis -- 8. The individualist premise and political community / Iain Hampsher-Monk -- 9. Incentives, inequality and community / G. A. Cohen -- 10. Citizenship and political obligation / Bhiku Parekh -- 11. Transnational justice: permeable boundaries and multiple identities / Onora O'Neill.

Socialism and the Common Good brings together a set of writings by some of the leading social and political thinkers at work in Britain today. Its object is to place before the public some seminal discussions of a central theme which is both theoretical and practical, namely the role of the state in achieving social justice in modern market systems from a socialist perspective. These essays touch many subjects, such as state ownership, collectivism, communitarianism, individualism, equality, citizenship, and national identity. Is state ownership essential to the common good? Is it only one among many possible means of securing social justice? Is communitarianism a threat to civil liberty? Is it, by contrast, a necessary condition for efficacy and fairness? The authors of these essays, all members of the Socialist Philosophy Group of the Fabian Society, follow no single line and approach these problems in diverse ways. The contributors, however, prove remarkably uniform in their rejection of the cult of choice and of rational egoism and in their promotion of a more robust and inclusive notion of community and of social responsibility.