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University of Virginia, The Lawn : Thomas Jefferson / Michael Brawne.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextSeries: Architecture in detailPublication details: London : Phaidon, 1994.ISBN:
  • 0714827525
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 727.309755481 20
Summary: Thomas Jefferson was a revolutionary statesman, lawyer, ambassador, farmer and third President of the United States. He was also a highly influential amateur architect. He contributed powerfully to the introduction of a new concept of classicism to his country, based on Roman precedents. The Lawn, Jefferson's campus design for the University of Virginia, represents an entirely new approach to university group planning. The epitome of Jefferson's rational yet romantic classicism, the campus demonstrates both his enthusiasm for Palladio and admiration for Rome, which enjoyed honorific status as the birthplace of republican virtue and the seat of a mighty empire. A project dear to his heart both academically and architecturally, Jefferson's 'academical village' (his own phrase) purposefully exhibited a selected variety of Roman orders. Groups of houses with porticoes are linked by colonnades in a formal plan, culminating in the great Pantheon-like Rotunda at the end of the oblong composition. Along with his own house at Monticello, the University campus is recognized as Jefferson's greatest architectural achievement.
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Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 720.973 JEF (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403831204
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Thomas Jefferson was a revolutionary statesman, lawyer, ambassador, farmer and third President of the United States. He was also a highly influential amateur architect. He contributed powerfully to the introduction of a new concept of classicism to his country, based on Roman precedents. The Lawn, Jefferson's campus design for the University of Virginia, represents an entirely new approach to university group planning. The epitome of Jefferson's rational yet romantic classicism, the campus demonstrates both his enthusiasm for Palladio and admiration for Rome, which enjoyed honorific status as the birthplace of republican virtue and the seat of a mighty empire. A project dear to his heart both academically and architecturally, Jefferson's 'academical village' (his own phrase) purposefully exhibited a selected variety of Roman orders. Groups of houses with porticoes are linked by colonnades in a formal plan, culminating in the great Pantheon-like Rotunda at the end of the oblong composition. Along with his own house at Monticello, the University campus is recognized as Jefferson's greatest architectural achievement.