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Three houses : Glenn Murcutt / E.M.Farrelly.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextSeries: Architecture in Detail SeriesPublication details: Phaidon Press, 1993.ISBN:
  • 0714828750
DDC classification:
  • 728 12A
Summary: Glenn Murcutt's houses bring the minimalist Miesian pavilion and the primitive hut into a new and peculiarly Australian synthesis. The three houses covered in this volume chart the development of his architectural thought. The Marie Short house, with its shed-like appearance, is an early instance of Murcutt's interest in deceptively 'primitive' form. Despite its tough exterior, the timber-lined interior of the building is a masterpiece of delicacy and warmth. The Ball-Eastaway house, designed for two artists as a gallery and dwelling, develops this sophistico-primitive aesthetic further. Clad entirely in corrugated steel, the building stands like a spaceship in the sparse bush, its smooth white interior an absolute refuge from the baked rock plateau on which it has landed. The Magney house, with its airy, expressionistic roof, marks a new level of confidence and maturity. All three houses demonstrate an alliance between the primitive and the refined that is characteristic of Murcutt's work.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Glenn Murcutt's houses bring the minimalist Miesian pavilion and the primitive hut into a new and peculiarly Australian synthesis. The three houses covered in this volume chart the development of his architectural thought. The Marie Short house, with its shed-like appearance, is an early instance of Murcutt's interest in deceptively 'primitive' form. Despite its tough exterior, the timber-lined interior of the building is a masterpiece of delicacy and warmth. The Ball-Eastaway house, designed for two artists as a gallery and dwelling, develops this sophistico-primitive aesthetic further. Clad entirely in corrugated steel, the building stands like a spaceship in the sparse bush, its smooth white interior an absolute refuge from the baked rock plateau on which it has landed. The Magney house, with its airy, expressionistic roof, marks a new level of confidence and maturity. All three houses demonstrate an alliance between the primitive and the refined that is characteristic of Murcutt's work.