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Drager House : Franklin D. Israel / Aaron Betsky.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextSeries: Architecture in detailPublication details: London : Phaidon, 1996.ISBN:
  • 0714833827
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 728.370979467 21
Summary: The Drager House is a single-family house built into a tight hillside site, which steps down in section to conform to the changing site condition. Specific elements such as staircases, terraces and loggias are used to join house and site, as are large corner windows, which the architect has employed to frame selected views of trees and sky, perpetuating what Israel describes as the tradition started in Los Angeles by Wright and Schindler of the mitred glass corner and the 'exposed box'. The Drager House represents the idiosyncrasy of architect and client, both of whom were free from the need to follow typological conventions; furthermore, it marks the culmination of three decades of architectural investigation concerned with the transformation of known types into more liberating ways of inhabiting our physical and cultural landscapes.
Holdings
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two Week Loan Two Week Loan College Lane Learning Resources Centre Main Shelves 720.973 ISR (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 4403830657
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Drager House is a single-family house built into a tight hillside site, which steps down in section to conform to the changing site condition. Specific elements such as staircases, terraces and loggias are used to join house and site, as are large corner windows, which the architect has employed to frame selected views of trees and sky, perpetuating what Israel describes as the tradition started in Los Angeles by Wright and Schindler of the mitred glass corner and the 'exposed box'. The Drager House represents the idiosyncrasy of architect and client, both of whom were free from the need to follow typological conventions; furthermore, it marks the culmination of three decades of architectural investigation concerned with the transformation of known types into more liberating ways of inhabiting our physical and cultural landscapes.